Official (1982-1988) 270DA Thread

Discussion in 'Classic Sea Rays' started by KC_Sundancer, Jun 20, 2012.

  1. KC_Sundancer

    KC_Sundancer New Member

    Sep 8, 2009
    Munising, Michigan (Lake Superior) Pictured Rocks
    1985 270DA Sundancer,Simrad 4G Radar,Lowrance Gen2 GPS/Sonar/Structure Scan,F350 7.3l Diesel, tri-ax
    twin Mercruiser 185R's (v6's) w/SE106 drives, "High Five" stainless props, Mercury 280 RIB w/9.9 Mer
    I see there is a 1990+ 270DA tread and thought one should be started for missing 80's 270DA's in the proper "classic" category.
    So here we go with sharing restorations, fixes, upgrades and any other items we may have in common.

    Any owners of 270DA's from beginning 1982 through final 1988 model year jump in and share your experiences :thumbsup:
     
  2. KC_Sundancer

    KC_Sundancer New Member

    Sep 8, 2009
    Munising, Michigan (Lake Superior) Pictured Rocks
    1985 270DA Sundancer,Simrad 4G Radar,Lowrance Gen2 GPS/Sonar/Structure Scan,F350 7.3l Diesel, tri-ax
    twin Mercruiser 185R's (v6's) w/SE106 drives, "High Five" stainless props, Mercury 280 RIB w/9.9 Mer
    I know this is a repeat of my original restoration post started back on 9/8/2009 but we have to start collaboration somewhere:





    Updated: 01/25/12
    We sold our 1988 22 Pachanga a few years back and picked up a 1985 27 Sundancer. Runs about half the speed with her twin V6's but a much more practical boat for our time spent on Lake Superior. It's like our "camp" on the water.

    I have spent alot of time bringing her as close as possible to like new condition if not better in some ways. The plan is to share much of my restoration, maintenance and use experiences to help take out that learning curve with anyone that may need it.

    My biggest project was replacement of the transom - tasked by not having a big enough building to put her in next to the house and over 180 inches of winter snowfall.

    I look forward to sharing.

    (If pics do not show refresh the webpage)

    [​IMG]

    Transom Replacement

    When the boat was purchased there were tell-tail signs of a rotted transom. With this in mind and knowing I could do the work myself (as a design engineer - not a fiberglass guy) I made the purchase with a drastically reduced price. In the end the transom work cost me around $1,500 in material and about 3 months of work, a few days a week.

    Two issues caused this rotting problem.
    First was when the boat sat in the water there was a slow leak from a hole from the original swim platform that was improperly filled. This overtime caused serious wood rot in the transom. The fiberglass on the inside of the transom could be pushed in easlily with a screwdriver.
    The second was a common problem these "Express Cruisers" are known for having. The large sliding cabin windows do not offer great structural support for the deck. Jumping, walking, etc. on the deck causes the old sealant to eventually break loose and start leaking. With steady rains it was clear that water was leaking through both windows and making it's way into the understructure of the boat. Wet carpet in the cabin, side pockets and sometimes under the cushions in the mid cabin are signs of the windows leaking. Sea Ray had an issue with not providing any weep holes in many of the foam filled compartments inside the hull which then slowly fill with water and start more rotting. This was clear with the areas under the water heater and batteries.
    Both side cabin windows were removed, completely disassembled, seals replaced, windows rebedded and then reinstalled using 3M 5200 to bond and seal them. This is expected to last much longer than the sealants used in the 80's. Note: you can still get the seals needed from Taylor Made, they will even send samples to be sure your ordering the proper one.


    Here are a few pics of the rotting warning signs:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Fiberglass delaminating from the understructure and cracking.

    Here are a few pics of what was uncovered:

    [​IMG]
    The "tea stain" hole in transom opened up - wood was like oatmeal.

    [​IMG]
    Side floor under batteries and water heater - same problem on both sides.

    The Beginning - clearing out the engine room:

    Choosing to work this next to my house required me to be a bit creative. I built a large "swingset" type frame out of 4x4's and 2x8's to pull the engines. This frame was then turned and extended to cover the full length of the boat to keep off the abundance of snow we get over the winter.

    [​IMG]
    Frame & chain-fall ready to pull engines.

    [​IMG]
    Pulling the second engine.
    Once the engine was hoisted, up the boat was pulled forward on the trailer.
    The engine was then lower and towed into the garage.

    [​IMG]
    Second engine ready to haul to the garage.

    [​IMG]
    Both engines and one drive completely removed.

    [​IMG]
    Kirsten helping with pulling the fuel tank.
    I did have to cut an angle on the stringers just ahead of the motor mounts to remove the fuel tank.
    The shape Sea Ray built into it fell 2 inches short of allowing the tank to be removed.
    The cuts allowed the tank to roll back and be hoisted out.

    [​IMG]
    Here you can see the angled cuts made to the stringer for fuel tank removal - pic taken after the project was completed

    Fuel Sending Unit:
    When the boat was pulled out the fuel tank was believed to be past empty according to the gauge.
    Turns out over 40 gallons were still in there.
    The fuel sending unit was replaced with a new WEMA USA stainless steel unit which is proving to be much more accurate.
    They are very affordable and easy to install.

    [​IMG]
    My other helper - Cedar

    [​IMG]
    Engines in the garage.
    Oil Pumps:
    While out I pulled the oil pans for inspection and installed new oil pumps.
    High volume NOT high pressure. Oil pump drive shafts were also replaced. The engines looked very clean internally.

    [I]Ignition:
    The points ignition system was done away with.
    Replaced them with Pertronix Electronic Ignition conversions.
    A very simple installation / conversion and much less maintenance to keep the engines "in tune" now.
    Of course our distributors were not specifically listed in their books but they were very helpful in choosing the right set-up.


    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/ign1.jpg[/IMG]

    The distributers are "evenfire" IBM 7018 on a pair of 185 Mercruisers (229 c.i.d. / 3.8 L Chervrolet V6's).
    [B][I]Pertronix 153A Ignitors with [B][I]Pertronix 40611 Epoxy Coils were used for the conversion.
    A simple installation - unscrew the old points and condensor plate and remove.
    Install the new ignition, connect the ground, coil and ignition wires.
    Warm up the engine, set the timing - done.
    Spark plug gap was increased .005"


    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/ign2.jpg[/IMG]

    This did need a modification in my case.
    A 1/8" spacer plate (hidden under the ignitor plate) had to be fabricated out of aluminum to raise the Ignitor Sensor.
    This was needed to align the pick-up with the magnets seen within the green area of the rotor in the photo above.

    This was a super improvement in performance - most noticeable at low RPM.
    Spark plugs are always a nice gold color when pulling them during winterizing.


    [B][I]Wrapped-Up

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_prep_8.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Now emptied out, the frame was turned, extended and used to cover the boat for the winter work.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com//images/misc/boat/forum/btw.jpg[/IMG]

    My winter working conditions.

    [B][SIZE=3]Now the messy work begins:[/SIZE]

    Digging out and removing the old rotted transom was a messy project.
    Most important item needed is a good respirator - you do NOT want to be breathing the heavy amounts of wood and fiberglass dust.
    What's needed: Respirator, Fans to remove the dust, Circular saw, 4 or 5 inch grinder, Sanding wheeels, Chisels, Hammer.
    Here is my cleaning process with pics following:

    First I marked where I wanted to cut the inside transom skin with a straight edge.
    Then set the circular saw about 1/8 of an inch shallower than the total thickness of the inner skin and wood core.
    On the inside of the boat I cut the periphery of the area to be replaced with the circular saw and removed the inner fiberglass skin.
    Any rotted wood was then dug out using chisels, screwdrivers, whatever I could reach with.
    The remaining "good" wood was then ground out using the 4 inch grinder. I tried everything and found "sanding" wheels worked best.
    Save the clean sanding dust to use as a "filler" later on.
    A thorough cleaning was done to ensure the outer hull was fully cleaned of the original transom wood on the inside.
    The rotted structure on either side of the boat was also cut-out and cleaned using the 4" grinder.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_prep_9.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]First circular saw cuts to remove center section of inner transom skin exposing extent of rotted wood.
    Additional cuts were made to remove the entire transom core.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_prep_7.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Thoroughly cleaned / removed transom and side structure.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_matl_3.jpg[/IMG]
    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_matl_4.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]This is the best wheel I found to use in the grinder for both removal and cleanup of the existing wood and inner side of the outer hull.

    [B]Time for the new stuff:

    [B][SIZE=3]What's needed ?[/SIZE][B]Marine Grade Plywood
    [B]Epoxy [I](does not get brittle like polyester's and bonds better to surfaces)
    [I]I ended up using (5) gallons at about $120 per gallon
    [B]Fiberglass Cloth
    [I]I used 11 yards of Bi-Lateral cloth and 14 yards of 10 oz plain weave
    [B]Measuring Buckets
    [B]Mixing Buckets
    [B]Paint Sticks
    [B]Lay-Down Roller - aluminum [I](helps set cloth and remove bubbles)
    [B]Pigment [I](for coloring of final layer)
    [B]8 foot 2 x 4 - qty: (4)
    [B]Threaded rod - qty (4)
    [B]Nuts and Fender Washers - qty (8) each
    [B]Fiberglass Antenna Sampler
    [B]Trim Head Deck Screws - 1 1/4" long, Stainless Steel[/B][/B][/B][/B][/B][/I][/B][/I][/B][/B][/B][/B][/I]
    [I][I][I][B][B][B][B][SIZE=3]Big Question - How much Epoxy / Resin do I need ?[/SIZE]

    I found out the general rule of thumb for "wetting" area of fiberglass cloth by one (1) Gallon of Epoxy / Resin is as follows:1.5 oz. cloth - 40 sq. yards
    2.5 oz. - 25 sq. yards
    4 oz. cloth - 15 sq. yards
    6 oz. - 10 sq. yards
    10 oz. cloth - 6.5 sq. yards
    18 oz. woven roving - 4.5 yards
    24 oz. woven roving - 3.5 yards

    Chopped Strand Matt by weight is 1 to 2
    One (1) pound of Matt uses about two (2) pounds of Epoxy / Resin

    [B]What is Woven Roving ? Woven Roving is basically a heavy cloth.[/B]
    [B]These are estimates as there are many variables such as:The thickness of the Epoxy / Resin - thinner covers more area.
    Application surface - bare wood will soak up and increase the amount needed.
    Check with your supplier when purchasing. They can get you close - I ended up needing an extra gallon as I went along.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_matl_1.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Bi-Lateral Cloth. Consists of a fiberglass matte sewn to a fiberglass cloth.
    [I]Two layers of this were used to cover the transom blending out onto the floor.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_matl_2.jpg[/IMG]
    Epoxy Used:
    E-cast CCA EPOXY RESIN w/ #305 HARDENER
    (5) gallons total
    From Eastpoint Fiberglass Sales near Detroit Mi

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/rollers.jpg[/IMG]
    Aluminum Lay-down Rollers
    They work great for working out air bubbles and setting the cloth laminates.
    I chose aluminum so they could be easily cleaned (before the epoxy sets) for future projects.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_matl_5.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Bolt and Weep Hole Liner Material
    Antenna Sample Pack - assortment of 6 inch long fiberglass sleeves
    From: Max-Gain Systems, Inc., 221 Greencrest Ct., Marietta, GA 30068

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_matl_6.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Trim Head Deck Screws - Stainless Steel

    [SIZE=3][B]Installing the new stuff:[/B][/SIZE][B]

    [B]Step One was to cut the pieces of marine plywood to shape for the transom and side structure.
    The transom required (2) pieces of 3/4 inch marine grade plywood laminated together for the 1 1/2 inch thickness needed.
    When laminating I wet the one piece of plywood with epoxy, worked in (1) layer of 10 oz. plain weave cloth, wet the opposing piece of plywood and sandwiched them together. I then used a numerous amount of 1 1/4" long stainless steel "trim head" screws to pull and hold them tightly together. The screw locations were roughly planned as they were NOT removed.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_19.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Laminated Cross Section (cut-out from outdrive holes)

    The Transom section needed multiple pieces to allow installation behind the stringers. In the photo below you can see how the the laminated transom pieces would overlap once installed.
    All edges of the lamination were sealed with multiple coats of epoxy before installation.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_18.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Overlap Detail


    [B]Step 2 was to install the laminated transom piece.
    The laminated transom piece was test fit.
    (4) holes were drilled from outside the boat for the threaded rod, one near the top and bottom of both outdrive openings.
    The (4) 2 x 4's were then match drilled (through the narrow side) to these holes.
    Everything was removed and the inner hull was coated with epoxy and layered with (1) layer of 10 oz. plain weave cloth.
    The mating side of the transom piece was then wet with epoxy, installed and clamped to the transom using the threaded rod and 2 x 4's.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_8.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Clamped Transom Pieces

    [B]Step 3 was installation of hole liners and filling of any "gaps".
    Fastener and drain holes were opened up to match the chosen tubing size, being careful to NOT go thru the outer hull.
    Fiberglass tubing was then cut to length and epoxied in place.
    Gaps between the transom pieces and the hull were then filled with a thick fiberglass dust / epoxy mixture.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_11.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Holes cut for the trim tab supply line and fasteners.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_12.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Trim tab holes with un-cut fiberglass tubing samples.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_10.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]"Lined" drain plug hole.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_9.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]"Gaps" filled with fiberglass dust / epoxy mixture.

    [B]Step 4 was installation of the side structure and covering the transom pieces.
    (2) layers of the Bi-lateral weave glass were used on the inside transom with one layer of the same glass on the side structure.
    The first layer was overlapped onto the "floor" by about 8 inches.
    The second layer and side structure glass ovelapped about 6 inches onto the floor.
    Note: "WEEP" holes were added to the aft-most corners of the side structure and exsting stringers to allow water to drain. Fiberglass tubing lined these holes as explained earlier.
    The Aluminum Lay-Down roller was a big help in working out air bubbles with this final glassing step.
    I did have minimal air bubbles in the side structure areas but was extremely pleased with the transom area.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_14.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Transom glass work

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_13.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Side structure glass work
    [I]It was too late once I started but rounding all the edges and corners would have helped.
    [I]Working out the air would have been much easier as the glass does not like to "fold" over corners.

    [B]Step 5 Put in the Outdrive Cut-outs and Fastener Holes.
    All of this was done from the outside using the existing holes and cut-out in the outer hull as a template.
    I first used a 2 inch hole saw to drill two holes at the top of each outdrive opening. The holes were drilled at a 45 degree angle - see pic below. This is for clearance of the steering arm on the inside when turning.
    Then the big hole was cut using a jig saw following the existing cut-out contour.
    Next I drilled the outdrive fastener holes perpindicular to the transom.
    They do have a drill jig available for the outdrive holes and cut-out but I opted to save a chunk of cash and just use the hull as a template - it worked fine.
    These holes were too close to the cut-out to allow use of the fiberglass tubing for a liner so I used a pipe cleaner type brush to apply multiple coats of epoxy to the inside of the holes. The Cut-out also recieved multiple coats of epoxy to seal-er up.
    The final step was to mix the grey pigment with epoxy and apply a final coat to everything for a nice clean colored look.


    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_20.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]The "angled" holes can be seen here looking from the inside.


    [B]Step 6 Put everything back together !

    [B]Be sure to replace the outdrive transom assembly Seals!

    [SIZE=3]A few notes on reassembly:[/SIZE]
    [B]New Outdrives:
    Two new SEI (Stern Drives Inc.) outdrives were installed. They are identical Mercruiser replacements with a (3) year no-condition warranty for half the cost - (about $2600 for the pair, shipped). Being a die-hard Mercruiser guy it was hard to make the choice but I now have over 150 hours on them and have been extremely pleased.
    [B]Gimbal Bearing Replacement / Engine Alignment Trick:
    Both Gimbal bearings were also replaced. Engine alignment was checked and set perfectly.
    When installing the drives one of them went in perfectly.
    The second was a struggle when it came to the last 3/4 inch of sliding in. Re-checked alignment - perfect, checked linkages, spline alignment, everything - still would not go in.
    (4) hours and a phone call later I found out the "shop" trick. After installing the new gimbal bearings, install the alignment tool and hit it both up-down and side-side with a rubber mallet or something similiar. This "frees" the bearing , Re-check and set alignment.
    Amazing the drive now slid right in.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_15.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]A nice clean difference.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_16.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]No more hanging wires.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/TR_REP_17.jpg[/IMG]

    This was the biggest of my projects, am very pleased with the outcome and glad I tackled it.
    When we took it our for the first time after I could really tell the boat felt much more solid in the rough water.
    The added weep holes are allowing everything to stay dry and it is much easier to keep clean now too.


    [SIZE=4][U][B][I]The Interior[/I][/B][/U][/SIZE][B][I]

    On the interior a microwave and flat screen TV were installed.

    For starters I made an addition to that slippery angled floor on the head using some of the extra 1/2 inch "starboard".

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/bth_1.jpg[/IMG]

    This is a photo of the angled floor that was very annoying - especially if using the shower and it's wet.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/bth_3.jpg[/IMG]

    This is the sub-floor made out of 1/2 inch "starboard".
    I used a heavy piece of cardboard to make a template to get started.
    The corner was cut on an angle to allow the shower water to flow down to the drain.
    It took a bit of fitting as the floor had a slight curve.
    The "starboard" is great to work with - cuts and sands just like wood.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/bth_2.jpg[/IMG]

    The completed project, much easier on the feet with the larger flat surface.
    The floor rests there snuggly and is easily lifted out for cleaning.

    [SIZE=3][I][U]Microwave[/U][/I][/SIZE][I]

    In the forward berth on the starboard side there was a cushion that can be relocated to make a seat which was never used.
    When the interior was re-upholstered, we had the multiple pieces made into one and a filler cushion made.
    This "seat" area below made a good location for our microwave. It was installed and fit with the original cushions still in the boat at the time.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/vbunk1.jpg[/IMG]

    Removing the filler cushion allows decent access to the microwave.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/micro1.jpg[/IMG]

    I made a sub floor for it and screwed it down to the existing ribs that supported the cushion.
    A slight angle had to be cut into the forward trim piece.
    The microwave was then attached to the sub floor with (4) brass angle brackets on the sides.
    It runs off shore power only and is plugged into the same outlet the refrigerator uses under the sink.

    [SIZE=3][U][I]TV and Entertainment[/I][/U][/SIZE][I]

    We chose a nice 15" LCD flat screen made by Magnavox (15MF400T/37 Series).
    This model used a 12 volt converter at the wall outlet.
    When installing I eliminated the converter and wired it directly to the boats 12 volt system.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/ent2.jpg[/IMG]

    It was installed over the entry to the aft bunk room with a heavy duty adjustable wall mount.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/ent3.jpg[/IMG]

    The (2) stainless steel fasteners were run through the wall from the Helm side. With the rough water conditions we often see I wanted to be sure it was mounted securely.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/ent1.jpg[/IMG]

    Sound is run through a Jensen Marine Stereo System (MCD5050).
    A compact RCA DVD player (DRC190N) was tucked nicely inside the storage area next to the radio.
    It is supported by brackets attached to the existing bolts coming through the deck for the railing.
    This runs off 110 volts and is powered though shore power or the inverter.

    Nothing like popcorn and a good "Pirates of the Caribean" with the kids out on the water.


    [B][I][U][SIZE=4]Aft Deck, Helm and Seating[/SIZE][/U]

    The un-used aft fold-down seat was converted into a storage locker for our stern anchor, lines and summer swim toys.


    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/dash_1.jpg[/IMG]

    The dash has had all the fuse holders replaced and re-wired.
    I still need to replace all the switches so they are the same.
    Also on the to do list is recovering of the panel with the spot light controls located below the throttles.

    [I][B]NEMA Network for GPS / Radar / VHF Radio / Depth Sounder

    When the boat was purchased, none of the electronics were taking advantage of the NEMA interface.
    We chose to upgrade our VHF to an ICOM IC-M422 with DSC and Distress Key.
    God forbid anything did happen - a simple push of a button sends out a distress call with GPS coordinates.

    To simplify the set-up I took a simple wall phone jack and removed the phone plug.
    I then attached a bar from Radio Shack to the cover plate.
    Color coded decals were made to identify how the wiring interfaced ( which system, in, out, etc.).

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/nema.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]NEMA Network Panel - located on wall behind the VHF Radio - accessed by lowering radio door.

    Very nice - now I have my GPS course & waypoints, Depth, Water Temp, etc. being shared throughout the electronics.
    Really helps when running in heavy fog as I only need to glance at the radar for info.


    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/seat_1.jpg[/IMG]

    The previous owner had a custom seat fabricated out of an aluminum channel.
    Much larger and more comfortable than the small jump seats.
    I have removed the jump seats and slide-out cooler.
    This opened up use of the beverage and map storage areas.
    It also has a great place for storing lines now where the cooler once was.
    I added the folding legs underneath as people tend to jump on the seat when entering the boat.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/seat_2.jpg[/IMG]

    Scooby and Cedar
    Here you can see how the folding brackets hold our scuba diving tanks to help keep the deck clear.
    This really makes things easier when gearing-up before a dive.

    [I][B][SIZE=4][U]Towing our Tender[/U][/SIZE]

    We have a 10 foot Quicksilver inflatable with a 15 H.P. Mercury we take along and use quite often.
    Our boat is equipped with a custom swim platform but I'm sure these ideas may be used with any platform and a little thought.


    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/tow_3.jpg[/IMG]

    I initially had a simple pair of "c" shaped devices made up of CPVC pipe and 1/2" stainless bolts for the pivot point.
    That worked great for rolling the boat up on its side on the swim platform.Side Note: Notice the new "starboard" floor in the tender.
    I have alot to share on inflatable repair so there will be more to come on that later.
    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/tow_4.jpg[/IMG]

    Loading the inflatable could easily be done by one person running the lines from the "c" devises under and over the inflatable and pulling up from inside the boat.
    It was then held securely by the same lines.
    The two down sides were needing to remove the motor and not being able to cross tie the boat without removing the tender when mooring .

    Trying to simplify things I thought why not tow it like a trailer. The location of the brackets happened to be spaced perfectly for the width of the inflatable and it's forward "D" rings.
    Using a few snap clips I gave it a try.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/tow_1.jpg[/IMG]

    This worked great. Even in rough seas it tows smoothly.
    Just the back edges of the sponsons ride in the water when on plane.
    Docking was excellent, the inflatable stays right with the boat so backing in is a breeze.
    The inflatable is also not in the way for cross tying the boat when in port.

    Cross ties off the transom of the inflatable help when going on and off plane as that is the only time it moves around a bit - nothing rough though.
    A rubber corner guard was also put on the edge of the swimplatform to protect the inflatable and the platform edge.





    A few notes:

    [LIST]
    [*]Use a safety line off the forward "D" ring "just in case".
    [*]Be sure to have "D" rings in good condition.
    [*]Lock the outboard in full tilt position.
    [/LIST]
    [SIZE=3][I][U]Stove Replacement[/U][/I][/SIZE][I]

    The original Princess alcohol/electric stove was removed. Electric worked fine but when roughing it the presurized alcohol was very un reliable.
    We chose a CookMate 4200 non-pressurized alcohol stove as a replacement. We have been extremely pleased with it's simplicity and cooking results.
    With installation I had to steal the outer frame from the Princess to frame the existing hole. The new stove had rounded corners that did not quite cover the opening.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/stove1.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Stove with Bamboo cutting Board

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/stove2.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Cutting Board Removed

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/stove3.jpg[/IMG]
    [I]Canister, wick type fuel containers with rubber storage caps in place

    [SIZE=3][I][U]Dining Table[/U][/I][/SIZE][I]

    A larger dining table was made using some scrap teak I had laying around and formica for the top. A new post was also installed in the floor. Much better for eating than the tiny table that came with the boat.

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/table.jpg[/IMG]

    [B][SIZE=4]Bow Pulpit and Windlass installed

    [/SIZE][IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/picture2.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/picture5.jpg[/IMG]

    Just finished installing a Lewmar ProFish 700 freefall windlass with 300 feet of 8 plait line, 20 feet of chain and a 25 lb. Manson anchor. I chose to remove the old pulpit and anchor locker hatch replacing it with a single piece. The new teak pulpit was made by Ship Shop Marine Carpentry in Fort Pierce Florida (772-215-9925). They did an excellent job for about half the price I found anywhere else in the country. I finished it with 5 coats of Epifanes Wood Finish Gloss. To securely attach and spread the windlass load; I used (3) bolts through the deck and (2) angles across the hatch opening. The angles "clamp" the aft end to the deck using the threaded rods from the windlass. I also wired the windlass with a reversing breaker so I can add controls on the deck at a later date.

    [B][SIZE=4]Name reworked
    [/SIZE][SIZE=4][SIZE=2]
    [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/new_name.jpg[/IMG] [IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/new_name2.jpg[/IMG]
    Call me superstitous but with the racing we believed changing a boat name was bad luck. We chose to stay with the origianal name on this boat too - "Wave Dancer". I have never been happy with the original graphics though as the colors did not go with anything. Doing graphics as a side job (something I got into with racing to save money) I finally took time to design our own character and redo the graphics. Just finished replacing everything with colors from the stripes incorporated.


    [/SIZE][/SIZE][B][SIZE=4]Latest update: [/SIZE][SIZE=4][SIZE=2][B][SIZE=4]Replaced Panels on Rear Deck[/SIZE]

    [/B][/SIZE][/SIZE][B][IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/brd2.jpg[/IMG]
    [SIZE=4][SIZE=2]
    [/SIZE][/SIZE][IMG]http://www.midwestconnection.com/images/misc/boat/brd1.jpg[/IMG][SIZE=4][SIZE=2]

    Carpet covered plywood along the transom and the exposed plywood supports were dried out and rotten from water on the back deck over the years.
    I found Sanshade Starboard almost perfectly matches the gel coat color of the mid 80's Sea Rays. This will be much easier to keep clean. The original brackets need to be adjusted a bit on one side and then I will seal up the edges to cut back on water getting behind them when washing down the deck.

    [/SIZE][/SIZE][B]Next project:
    [I][I]Upgrade electronics.


    [I][B]Check back [B]for updates - Later Eh ![/B][/B][/I][/I][/I][/B][/B][/B][/B][/B][/I][/I][/I][/I][/I][/B][/I][/I][/B][/I][/I][/B][/I][/I][/I][/B][/I][/I][/B][/B][/B][/B][/I][/B][/I][/I][/I][/I][/B][/I][/I][/I][/I][/B][/I][/B][/I][/I][/B][/B][/I][/I][/I][/I][/B][/B][/B][/B][/B][/I][/I][/I][/B][/I][/I][/B][/B][/B][/B][/I][/I][/I][/B][/I][/I][/B][/I][/B][/I][/B][/I]
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2012
  3. Pachanga Boy

    Pachanga Boy Member

    359
    Aug 25, 2011
    Cincinnati
    270 Sundancer 1988
    twin 4.3L
    KC I've been subsribed to your original thread since I bought my 88...I've said it before but, fantastic work!

    heck ya (raises glass) Here is to the largest 270 Sea Ray ever made!
    sadly I think this might be the 3rd or so attempt to make an 80's 270 thread. but hopefully with this one having the "Official" in the name will draw us all together into one.
    the other threads for reference
    http://clubsearay.com/showthread.php/50100-1980s-270-club
    http://clubsearay.com/showthread.php/45709-Early-80s-Sundancer-270?highlight=sundancer+270

    we love our 88, the 10' beam and seperate salon seating sold us in a heartbeat. between handling, cabin space, and storage space, it was no contest. only minor gripes (besides the age) is the A/C location under the v-birth (noisy), no drain in the footwell leading into the cabin, the sloped floor in the head, and the narrow footing leading to the bow.
    in her slip
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    last weekend at Put-in-bay island tied up to my buddy in his 275 Donzi.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I'm sure you've all seen these, but...

    before and after's
    original interior:
    [​IMG]
    updated (prior to new fridge install):
    [​IMG]
    new 19" dvd combo
    [​IMG]
    underwater LED's
    [​IMG]

    future plans: upgrade cockpit stereo, cigerette lighter for cockpit (really no factory outlet?), LED cabin lighting, windlass, new deck stripes, fix searchlight, make curtains for cabin, reupholster midcabin cushions....and about 50 other things I'm sure I'll add to the list before winter:grin:
     
  4. MMcCawley

    MMcCawley Member

    156
    Sep 11, 2010
    San Clemente, Ca
    1989 268 Sundancer
    454 Mercruiser w/Bravo I Drive
    Do either of trailer your 270's? I'm curious how the extra beam width compares to the 268's on the highway.
     
  5. Pachanga Boy

    Pachanga Boy Member

    359
    Aug 25, 2011
    Cincinnati
    270 Sundancer 1988
    twin 4.3L
    MMcCawley, I actually do have a trailer for it but never use it other then for storage, not to speak for KC but I do beleive he has trailered his.....like hundreds of miles, but I might be mistaken. you'd have to check the rules for your state but likely you'd need to purchase a wide load permit since the beam is over the 8'6" maximum. height wise I think it dends on the trailer if you'd have to pull the radar arch down (if equpied).
     
  6. KC_Sundancer

    KC_Sundancer New Member

    Sep 8, 2009
    Munising, Michigan (Lake Superior) Pictured Rocks
    1985 270DA Sundancer,Simrad 4G Radar,Lowrance Gen2 GPS/Sonar/Structure Scan,F350 7.3l Diesel, tri-ax
    twin Mercruiser 185R's (v6's) w/SE106 drives, "High Five" stainless props, Mercury 280 RIB w/9.9 Mer
    Cheer's :thumbsup:

    Usually twice a year for me - winter storage here in Michigan.
    I did do a tow to and from Florida while working down there last year.
    Strapped everything down: Two straps on the transom, winch hook, safety chain and an added strap pulling straight down on the front tow eye (stops nose from lifting with trailer flex). Cost me about $150 for all the state wide load permits. I got 10 mpg with our F350's 7.3 Diesel.
    As far as the added beam; forget about your rear view mirrors and there is more wind resistance noticeable.
    The important thing is to have the proper tow vehicle and don't be in a hurry. There is alot of mass with these boats.
    Permits here in Michigan went up, they were $30 dollars for the year (1) permit. Now they require (3) permits, (1) for the boat, (1) for the trailer and (1) for the truck. Just a way to get more money from us.
    I'm not sure about California but I am sure your permits are much less than the fines if you do not have one. You also have to watch possible restrictions on hours and days of travel. Sometimes only daylight, no Sunday's, no Holiday's, each state is different. :huh:

    Here are a few pics before heading back to Michigan:
    (canvas was removed for the trip and radar arch was already back home)

    [​IMG]
    1999 F350, 7.3 Powerstroke Diesel, Karavan triple axle trailer with 4 wheel electric brakes (utility - no fancy paint or wheels)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Crossing the Mackinac Bridge with 120 miles to go after a 2 day, wide load haul.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2012
  7. KC_Sundancer

    KC_Sundancer New Member

    Sep 8, 2009
    Munising, Michigan (Lake Superior) Pictured Rocks
    1985 270DA Sundancer,Simrad 4G Radar,Lowrance Gen2 GPS/Sonar/Structure Scan,F350 7.3l Diesel, tri-ax
    twin Mercruiser 185R's (v6's) w/SE106 drives, "High Five" stainless props, Mercury 280 RIB w/9.9 Mer
    Greg,

    Have you had a hard time getting your permits in Ohio?
    On my trip to Florida we avoided Ohio and took the Indiana route just because of the hard time permits are with insurance requirements and red tape.
    I was just wondering if it was easier as an Ohio resident?

    Keith
     
  8. Getaway

    Getaway Member

    875
    Oct 13, 2010
    Bay City, Michigan
    Lowrance electronics, Fishhawk speed-n-temp, Scotty electric downriggers and custom arch
    Single big block 454 Mercruiser engine and outdrive.
    Nice boats guys. You basically have my 268, but with 10ft beam. I showed the wife a 270 the other day and she fell in love with it....

    Kinda like the difference between a regular camper and a camper with a slide-out.

    Anybody know anyone that wants a close to perfect 268DA :grin:?
     
  9. Pachanga Boy

    Pachanga Boy Member

    359
    Aug 25, 2011
    Cincinnati
    270 Sundancer 1988
    twin 4.3L
    well I don't have all the details, but when I was toying with the idea of towing the boat home to work on it all spring, I found from the DOT that I just needed a "blanket" permit which was $100 for the year, I didn't think it mattered if you were a resident or not.
    example form:
    http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Operations/Maintenance/Permits/Documents/Os1-Cmpltd.pdf

    the very detailed outline of the permit:lol: I think long as they make money they don't really care
    http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Operations/Maintenance/Permits/Pages/BOATHAULINGPERMIT.aspx
     
  10. skyscraper88

    skyscraper88 New Member

    60
    Apr 7, 2012
    Iowa, mississippi river
    1988 270da
    Twin 4.3L4 205hp

    Don't know of anyone right off hand, But we got our 88' 270 in March and WE LOVE IT! I am 6'9" and 350lbs, I can't stand up in my boat(except thru one of the hatches) but as far as room to move, the 10' beam is great! the extra space in the solon makes it so much eaiser for me to move around. The only issue i have is the helm. Not much leg room with the bench seat configuration, and the height of the seat requires me to sit on an extra cushion to see over the windshield.
     
  11. skyscraper88

    skyscraper88 New Member

    60
    Apr 7, 2012
    Iowa, mississippi river
    1988 270da
    Twin 4.3L4 205hp
    Hey KC, what type of winch do you have on your trailer. Is it manual or is it electric. I have an electric. We trailer ours everytime we go out. (3 miles) I am looking for a manual winch to load with but I can't seem to find one that has the weight capacity I need. any suggestions??
     
  12. KC_Sundancer

    KC_Sundancer New Member

    Sep 8, 2009
    Munising, Michigan (Lake Superior) Pictured Rocks
    1985 270DA Sundancer,Simrad 4G Radar,Lowrance Gen2 GPS/Sonar/Structure Scan,F350 7.3l Diesel, tri-ax
    twin Mercruiser 185R's (v6's) w/SE106 drives, "High Five" stainless props, Mercury 280 RIB w/9.9 Mer
    She would be pleased with the ride difference too. Growing up with the 8"-6" beamed boats, it's amazing to see how much roll is reduced in rougher seas.
    I'm sure some of your fishing buddies down there would have an interest in yours, you have a great set-up. Isn't it a tournament winner too? That should add $$$$ :grin:
     
  13. KC_Sundancer

    KC_Sundancer New Member

    Sep 8, 2009
    Munising, Michigan (Lake Superior) Pictured Rocks
    1985 270DA Sundancer,Simrad 4G Radar,Lowrance Gen2 GPS/Sonar/Structure Scan,F350 7.3l Diesel, tri-ax
    twin Mercruiser 185R's (v6's) w/SE106 drives, "High Five" stainless props, Mercury 280 RIB w/9.9 Mer
    I replaced our original one 4 years ago with a MANUAL "SeaSense" brand 2500# all purpose winch. I use a cable instead of a strap that I need to replace, it just started fraying. The winch has two speeds and can be freewheeled. As far as the weight rating you are not lifting the entire boat but rather pulling it so you only need to have it rated for a portion of the total weight. We have a steep ramp here, it pulls with very little effort and has worked good to this point. :huh:
     
  14. skyscraper88

    skyscraper88 New Member

    60
    Apr 7, 2012
    Iowa, mississippi river
    1988 270da
    Twin 4.3L4 205hp
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2012
  15. Pachanga Boy

    Pachanga Boy Member

    359
    Aug 25, 2011
    Cincinnati
    270 Sundancer 1988
    twin 4.3L

    agreed it is a huge difference! we looked at a 268 with twin 4.3's and did a sea trial the day before we looked at the 270. We loved everything about the 268, but I couldn't beleive how much it would rock or roll on plane depending on where people stood or moved in the boat. sea trial on the 270 the next day was a big differece with little to no roll. then in the cabin I noticed we could actually walk past each other with out one of us having to sit down. I'm still fascinated how just 1'-6" in beam can make such a dramatic difference.
    Being used to the Pachanga I'd say our 270 lets out more of an "oink" then a "growl" in terms of driving manners, but that's no surprise. I'm still very wet behind the ears in terms of learning her sweet spots in terms of trim and docking manuevers but I'm slowly getting there. I'd love to see what she can do in the rough stuff (biggest is some 2' rollers) but haven't had the right oppurtunity....and I really need to master docking her first. so far I haven't really made the most of her twins setup.
     
  16. skyscraper88

    skyscraper88 New Member

    60
    Apr 7, 2012
    Iowa, mississippi river
    1988 270da
    Twin 4.3L4 205hp


    Very well said Pachanga Boy. I to have not mastered the twin set up.
     
  17. skyscraper88

    skyscraper88 New Member

    60
    Apr 7, 2012
    Iowa, mississippi river
    1988 270da
    Twin 4.3L4 205hp


    Very well said Pachanga Boy. I to have not mastered the twin set up.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2012
  18. skyscraper88

    skyscraper88 New Member

    60
    Apr 7, 2012
    Iowa, mississippi river
    1988 270da
    Twin 4.3L4 205hp
    Do the 1988 270's have a vent filter on the waste holding tank? I have tried to pump out my tank twice with no luck. The little light on the panel in the head show that the tank is full, but nothing comes out. Is there a valve to "flip" or something that needs to be "turned on?" :smt100
     
  19. KC_Sundancer

    KC_Sundancer New Member

    Sep 8, 2009
    Munising, Michigan (Lake Superior) Pictured Rocks
    1985 270DA Sundancer,Simrad 4G Radar,Lowrance Gen2 GPS/Sonar/Structure Scan,F350 7.3l Diesel, tri-ax
    twin Mercruiser 185R's (v6's) w/SE106 drives, "High Five" stainless props, Mercury 280 RIB w/9.9 Mer
    The suction line from your tank may be plugged :huh:
    Have you tried putting a little water in the tank from the deck fitting when you were pumping out to see what happens?
    If you are not getting a good seal at the deck fitting they will sometimes not pump out.
    Try a screw in adapters, or letting a hose trickle water around the fitting to help it seal.

    The previous owner of ours pulled the entire waste system out.
    I now have a 5 gallon portable toilet hooked up to our pump-out lines so I can't be too much more help for you.


    Kind of a sh#^%y problem you have :smt043
     
  20. Pachanga Boy

    Pachanga Boy Member

    359
    Aug 25, 2011
    Cincinnati
    270 Sundancer 1988
    twin 4.3L
    Oddly I've never had to pump ours out. PO did it before we bought it at the end of the season, haven't really used the head more then a handful of times...I was thinking about emptying just for the heck of it to avoid any sort of solid buildup (ewww), but it's low on my priority list....hmmm wonder if I'll have troubles.
     

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