65 ft. MY sinking near South Bass?

New Horizon

Member
Nov 1, 2018
103
Boat Info
420 Aft Cabin MY 1997
Engines
Twin 3116 Cats.
Does anyone have any updates or info on the 65 ft. MY that sank near South Bass on Saturday? I know it was very windy but that boat should have handled it ok.
 
The conditions in those photos don't look very severe. Maybe 2-3ft seas. A 65ft motor yacht with an experienced captain should have no issues other than docking in those conditions.
 
This is what a friend said happened


I heard new captain left port on empty ran out of fuel. Boat 2 years old.

Second boat left crews nest to save crew and wind threw them on rocks and sunk.
 
This is what a friend said happened


I heard new captain left port on empty ran out of fuel. Boat 2 years old.

Second boat left crews nest to save crew and wind threw them on rocks and sunk.

Ohh man...can you imagine that feeling. But what are the chances both engines run out of fuel at the exact same time? Seems a bit fishy?
 
Ohh man...can you imagine that feeling. But what are the chances both engines run out of fuel at the exact same time? Seems a bit fishy?
I was there a few weeks ago when the guy ran aground on PIB and ripped off half his running gear. Then beached it on the ramp downtown.
I heard six different stories until I talked to the guy who was on the radio with the captain and told him to beach it on the ramp. It’s tough to believe any of these “I know what happened” stories until you talk to the people directly involved
 
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I was there a few weeks ago when the guy ran aground on PIB and ripped off half his running gear. Then beached it on the ramp downtown.
I heard six different stories until I talked to the guy who was on the radio with the captain and told him to beach it on the ramp. It’s tough to believe any of these “I know what happened” stories until you talk to the people directly involved

A 60 foot sea ray was destroyed on Lake Michigan for five years ago and we still don’t know why that came down.
 
I’ll bet it’s a bit of a struggle insuring the next boat.

65A8E6A3-6795-4C72-80B6-067E2EDE62E2.jpeg
 
I’ll bet it’s a bit of a struggle insuring the next boat.

View attachment 112245

Sheesh, TowBoat couldn't get that thing out same day? Or at least anchor the heck out of it to keep it from moving? That's surprising.

I wonder...can the CSR collective now claim salvage rights to this boat? Let's organize a half dozen Sundancers and see if we can tow this thing...somewhere. :):)
 
Sheesh, TowBoat couldn't get that thing out same day? Or at least anchor the heck out of it to keep it from moving? That's surprising.

I wonder...can the CSR collective now claim salvage rights to this boat? Let's organize a half dozen Sundancers and see if we can tow this thing...somewhere. :):)
You wouldn’t have to cleanup the fuel spill :)
 
I wonder...can the CSR collective now claim salvage rights to this boat? Let's organize a half dozen Sundancers and see if we can tow this thing...somewhere. :):)


I'll get out my waders.:D
 
This is definitely one I will be following as to what really happened and why did the second boat (as reported) sink?
 
So is the conclusion, the boat went aground on rocks?

That could account for taking on so much water, if the hull was damaged.
 
Ohh man...can you imagine that feeling. But what are the chances both engines run out of fuel at the exact same time? Seems a bit fishy?
Insurance job? Past due on payments, take it out to see with no fuel?
Wassup widat?

That boat should be capable of handling 8' or larger seas.
 
The rumors are swirling up here, but the overall summary is that the Captain switched the fuel valve from port tank to starboard tank and got a bubble of air in the line. He lost both engines and subsequently electric power, couldn’t get them started, and without power couldn’t drop anchor (or it didn’t bite) and blew onto the rocks. It sounds like a frustrating sequence of mechanical failures that occurred within minutes of being blown onto the rocks on a day with 20+knot winds.
 
The rumors are swirling up here, but the overall summary is that the Captain switched the fuel valve from port tank to starboard tank and got a bubble of air in the line. He lost both engines and subsequently electric power, couldn’t get them started, and without power couldn’t drop anchor (or it didn’t bite) and blew onto the rocks. It sounds like a frustrating sequence of mechanical failures that occurred within minutes of being blown onto the rocks on a day with 20+knot winds.

A 75 Hatteras has all fuel tanks centerline. The windlass is DC powered, if they didn’t have power to that I’m guessing it was likely a voltage drop of some sort or they cranked the engines so long trying to prime that they ran down the batteries.
 
Today’s rumor update is that they ran out of gas in their main tanks and the air bubble occurred while switching to the auxiliary tank. There’s still conflicting reports on whether the windlass didn’t have power or the anchor didn’t bite, but some photos show the anchor chain down so they at least tried.
 

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