Wood question

Discussion in 'Newbie Lounge - NEW' started by Hoof Arted, Dec 19, 2011.

  1. Hoof Arted

    Hoof Arted New Member

    19
    Dec 14, 2011
    Knoxville, TN
    1975 SRV240, yellow and BIG (for me)
    Ford 302-233 horsepower
    ok, my 1975 SRV 240 has a few "rotting wood" problems. I have gotten all of the rotted wood removed (Very carefully) and laid out in my garage so I can trace the pieces onto some new wood and replace them......I done GOOOOOOOOD on this aspect of the project, now I can't find any "Marine grade" lumber locally. What can I use, pine, oak, cedar, etc to make my repairs.

    I was told by an older guy at Home Depot I could use pine, but I need to use Thompson's deck sealer before and after I install the parts.

    Mainly, I need about 6 feet of 2x2 a 24x12 piece of 1/2" plywood to make all of my repairs...

    Would I be better off using some aluminum angle instead of the 2x2's?:smt100

    Suggestions???????
     
  2. MonacoMike

    MonacoMike Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Sep 15, 2009
    Indiana lakes and Lake Michigan
    97 270DA 5k Kohler A/C,
    85 Monaco 197
    7.4 300hp BII,
    260hp Alpha 1
    I'm not a boat restoration expert, but that advice seems bad. When I had a rotted floor panel over the gas tank I used pressure treated plywood and coated it with epoxy from West Systems. It is available at West Marine and was easy to do, and wow, is it strong. MM

    http://www.westsystem.com/ss/
     
  3. Hoof Arted

    Hoof Arted New Member

    19
    Dec 14, 2011
    Knoxville, TN
    1975 SRV240, yellow and BIG (for me)
    Ford 302-233 horsepower

    Thanks for the info! I am VERY new to the boating scene and didn't think his answer was right but I wasn't sure.........

    I will see if I can find some pressure treated 2x2's at the local Home Depot and Lowe's....
     
  4. fwebster

    fwebster Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor PLATINUM Sponsor

    Oct 6, 2006
    Middle Tennessee ; Panama City Beach, FL
    1996 450DA
    3116 Caterpillars
    Wait..............

    Don't use regular pressure treated wood in any boat project. Pressure treating pumps the wood full of liquid preservatives and chemicals so you end up with saturated wood with a very high moisture content. When you cut and fit the pieces your repair, they will fit the day you install them, but that will shrink by up to 20% in length and width as the wood dries out. That will leave gaps around the pressure treated wood and cause general weakness in the repair. Besides shrinkage, you will have some difficulty getting resin or epoxy to adhere to fresh...(from Home Depot or Lowes)...pressure treated lumber. My other issue with regular pressure treated wood is that it is usually #3 quality lumber to begin with. You should be looking for #1 grade wood if you are going to repair a boat.

    There are some specialty lumber retailers that stock kiln dried pressure treaded lumber. It is very expensive and will need to be sawed straight on one edge to begin, but it won't shrink an appreciable amount. ANother approach is to use marine grade or exterior grade (13 ply) mahogany cabinet quality plywood.
     
  5. MonacoMike

    MonacoMike Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Sep 15, 2009
    Indiana lakes and Lake Michigan
    97 270DA 5k Kohler A/C,
    85 Monaco 197
    7.4 300hp BII,
    260hp Alpha 1
    Guess we have now established for sure that I'm NOT a "boat restoration expert", I just knew the HD advice was wrong. Thanks Frank. ...And to the OP, since you are new around here, Frank IS the expert. MM
     
  6. northern

    northern Well-Known Member

    Jan 17, 2007
    West coast Vancouver to Alaska
    380 Aft Cabin 1989 GPS and Charts by Nobeltec
    Twin 454 strait shaft
    I too am no wood expert but there is grade of maple that will resist rot. There was an old gentalman at our marina that new wood. Teak was his favorate but it go so expensive he was using a maple that he said was almost as good as teak. Cedar rots slower than most woods but when moisture sits on it, it will rot. No idea where you can get advice on woods. Putting the wrong stuff would be bad after all the work you have done.
     
  7. Henry Boyd

    Henry Boyd Well-Known Member PLATINUM Sponsor

    Apr 24, 2007
    Newburyport, on the peaceful and serene Merrimack
    02' 280 DA
    496 w BIII
    1. Are your dimensions all inches?
    2. Is the 2 x 2 an actual 2 inches by 2 inches, or a piece of wood that is sold as a "2x2" but 1 3/4 x 1 3/4"?

    You can get marine lumber from Boulter Plywood (boulterplywood.com). They also sell marine plywood in partial sheets, as well as providing a cutting service. They are located in Somerville MA and will ship UPS. The lumber is sold only partially machined, so you will need to buy over size and either plane it down, or mill it on a table saw with a very good blade.

    Henry
     
  8. Hoof Arted

    Hoof Arted New Member

    19
    Dec 14, 2011
    Knoxville, TN
    1975 SRV240, yellow and BIG (for me)
    Ford 302-233 horsepower
    Yes, the dimensions are 2"x2" or close to it.... All this is for is the motor "cover" and some pieces that go along the top of the transom area that hold up the "coolers" mounted to the transom wall. Sorry if I have miss named the area..... Again, still very wet behind the ears when it comes to boats.
     
  9. Henry Boyd

    Henry Boyd Well-Known Member PLATINUM Sponsor

    Apr 24, 2007
    Newburyport, on the peaceful and serene Merrimack
    02' 280 DA
    496 w BIII
    If you post some pictures I can get a better idea of what species/type of wood to use as replacement.

    Henry
     
  10. OldSkool

    OldSkool Active Member

    May 8, 2010
    Boating on Raystown Lake, Pa
    restored 1976 SRV200
    188 Mercruiser I/O
    Pressure treated from the big box stores can bleed through vinyl and discolor it badly. Forget about gluing down any floor covering to it, the mastic won't hold.I used marine grade plywood and coated it with a good layer of enamel paint before attaching the vinyl. You can epoxy it but if you are using stainless steel staples to attach vinyl then it may be a bit hard to drive them through.
    Shrinkage is a huge issue as Frank has said. Kiln dried PT is the way to go.
     
  11. Hoof Arted

    Hoof Arted New Member

    19
    Dec 14, 2011
    Knoxville, TN
    1975 SRV240, yellow and BIG (for me)
    Ford 302-233 horsepower
    I will take some pics tonight....if it isn't raining too hard.

    So I guess using some aluminum "angle" is or isn't a good idea???? I have a friend who can powder coat it for me for a 6 pack of the cheap stuff :)
     
  12. Hoof Arted

    Hoof Arted New Member

    19
    Dec 14, 2011
    Knoxville, TN
    1975 SRV240, yellow and BIG (for me)
    Ford 302-233 horsepower
    Transom Area Close.jpg Transom Area Close-new piece.jpg

    Here are a couple pics, the red area is what I am wnating to build out...
     
  13. Hoof Arted

    Hoof Arted New Member

    19
    Dec 14, 2011
    Knoxville, TN
    1975 SRV240, yellow and BIG (for me)
    Ford 302-233 horsepower
    it won't let me upload any more pics..... will try again later
     
  14. Hoof Arted

    Hoof Arted New Member

    19
    Dec 14, 2011
    Knoxville, TN
    1975 SRV240, yellow and BIG (for me)
    Ford 302-233 horsepower
    you can see where I installed a pine 2x4 across the back of the boat just as a support until I can get some proper lumber..
     
  15. Hoof Arted

    Hoof Arted New Member

    19
    Dec 14, 2011
    Knoxville, TN
    1975 SRV240, yellow and BIG (for me)
    Ford 302-233 horsepower
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2011
  16. MonacoMike

    MonacoMike Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Sep 15, 2009
    Indiana lakes and Lake Michigan
    97 270DA 5k Kohler A/C,
    85 Monaco 197
    7.4 300hp BII,
    260hp Alpha 1
    The best way to do photos here is to get a Photobucket.com account upload the photos there then paste them in your post. We are restricted on space for photos here but PB does not and is free. MM
     
  17. Henry Boyd

    Henry Boyd Well-Known Member PLATINUM Sponsor

    Apr 24, 2007
    Newburyport, on the peaceful and serene Merrimack
    02' 280 DA
    496 w BIII
    I'd get a full sheet of marine plywood. The "2x4" can be easily fabricated by laminating several strips of plywood glued together with epoxy. In fact you could paint that with epoxy and then you'd never have to worry about moisture.

    Henry
     
  18. wish2fish

    wish2fish Active Member

    Dec 19, 2006
    Locust Creek, Ohio River mm 433
    2003 220BR
    5.0 MPI
    You need help from Friscoboater. Here is his YouTube link. Hope you don't have anything to do for a while there is a lot of info here. [video]http://www.youtube.com/user/FriscoJarretts[/video]
     
  19. Loneranger

    Loneranger Active Member

    May 2, 2008
    Knoxville TN
    2000 SeaRay Sundancer 270
    7.4l Mercruiser w/ Bravo III
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/00..._m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1E613AMQ082999C02CEC

    http://www.amazon.com/Boatowners-Me...=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1324419475&sr=1-1

    Either or both of the above books would be a great help for you in your restoration efforts. I have both of them and they are both great. All I do is maintenance and upgrades and find them invaluable. The Casey book has more on the fiberglass and wooden parts of the boat. The Calder book is a much better electrical and mechanical book although Casey does cover electrical and mechanical. They both were initially aimed at sail boaters but they work equally well for power boaters (just skip the sections on rigging and sailwork).

    John
     
  20. MonacoMike

    MonacoMike Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Sep 15, 2009
    Indiana lakes and Lake Michigan
    97 270DA 5k Kohler A/C,
    85 Monaco 197
    7.4 300hp BII,
    260hp Alpha 1
    I might add this was what was recomended to me before I found CSR. I did use big box store PT plywood, acheived good adheision to the surface, and experienced no noticeable shrinkage. I predrilled mounting holes and sealed it with epoxy in the holes, additionally it was too hard to staple so I glued the carpet in place over my panel. It worked for my simple application as it will likely last longer than the 85 boat will. MM
     

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