Official Cummins 6cta 450C thread

Oilite (copper) thrust bearings in a gear are typically a component of the clutch packs. Shaft and gears are in tapered roller bearings not containing copper. At least in the ZF gears I've seen. Copper thrust washers have tangs to prevent them from spinning in their aluminum housing so if the bearing is turning on the aluminum then the indication as shown but it would be a lot more aluminum IMO. Additionally copper based thrust washers have a babbitt coating so Tin and Lead would also be an indication. The copper can also be from the gear oil cooler and corrosion there; this is a lot of copper. Significant copper from an oil cooler will usually be accompanied with the elements from the raw water. Like the reports state the oil age (hours) and type are needed.
At this point I'd have the broker notify the owner of the analysis' and try to get more data on the oil. Secondly, if the mechanic did not change the oil, I'd get another validation sample. It takes running the boat to get gear oil up to temperature for a good sample...
 
Re the Racors, did you turn the fuel valves off to change the filters? Did you turn them back on afterwards? Don't ask me how i know......
Yes the valves are turned on. I checked, double checked and triple checked. LOL. But I hear ya... thank you for replying. I was just down there and it's like the RACORs are draining down on their own and that's after replacing the Bosch lift pump.
 
Yes the valves are turned on. I checked, double checked and triple checked. LOL. But I hear ya... thank you for replying. I was just down there and it's like the RACORs are draining down on their own and that's after replacing the Bosch lift pump.
More troubleshooting today. I hooked up a sucker pump with additional line via the RACOR to simulate the boat trying to get fuel. Interesting enough, I got a lot of girlge (air) noises when doing so and then about 5-10 seconds later after the air purged, poof... fuel was flowing through there very steady.

Is it possible that I got all the air out of there? Is there some other kind of pump associated with/near the Bosch prime pump that would potentially allow fuel to drain down and not keep the system pressurized? if so, what is that part called?
 
Yes, it’s just a plug. Temps there are much cooler than I thought. Stays in the mid 150’s. I did my coolant change this fall so figured I would add a sensor. Pic from my sea trial this weekend wot run.

Edit:note with the garmins I can set the threshold so visually the temps will display red if too low or too high.
I like all the information you were getting on the Garman.
my question is which sensors are you using to get the Nema 2000 information to the Garman?
i’d like to start with boost pressure, and EGT.
 
I like all the information you were getting on the Garman.
my question is which sensors are you using to get the Nema 2000 information to the Garman?
i’d like to start with boost pressure, and EGT.
Using sensors from these guys. 2 seasons now with boost and egt sensors. Rock solid.
 
The stator was in bad shape on one of them, so I found new alternators on Amazon. Made in China, so I pulled the fuse on the grid heaters to give them a fighting chance. If it gets too smoky as it get colder I’ll have to put the fuses back in. Otherwise the batteries tested good. Not sure if there is anything else that’s killing them.
We toasted our batteries this summer (an expensive adventure!) and in troubleshooting the root cause I did note that the grid heaters suck a lot of power when cycling. Was thinking of disconnecting the heaters as well, didn't realize there were fuses which could be pulled, where are they located? Boat is shrink wrapped now so won't be able to track down until spring.

Is the consequence of disconnecting the grid heaters just some additional smoking? no risks to the engine longterm?
 
We toasted our batteries this summer (an expensive adventure!) and in troubleshooting the root cause I did note that the grid heaters suck a lot of power when cycling. Was thinking of disconnecting the heaters as well, didn't realize there were fuses which could be pulled, where are they located? Boat is shrink wrapped now so won't be able to track down until spring.

Is the consequence of disconnecting the grid heaters just some additional smoking? no risks to the engine longterm?
Two years ago I lost the port grid heater. I took all the parts off and left the strbd working to see what the difference would be between the strbd and port….. there was no difference at all
 
For a few season's only one of my grid heaters worked. I never noticed a difference in smoke between the 2 so i removed them both. I believe there is also a sensor to the transmission that cuts them off after a certain rpm. So they normally only run at idle when air temps are low (early spring and late fall). From what I've read they are intended for near and sub freezing temperatures to really make a noticeable difference. Also the fuse is located on the wire bundle at the heaters. Probably well taped up and painted.
 
We toasted our batteries this summer (an expensive adventure!) and in troubleshooting the root cause I did note that the grid heaters suck a lot of power when cycling. Was thinking of disconnecting the heaters as well, didn't realize there were fuses which could be pulled, where are they located? Boat is shrink wrapped now so won't be able to track down until spring.

Is the consequence of disconnecting the grid heaters just some additional smoking? no risks to the engine longterm?

Didn't you have them put in a zippered door?
 
We toasted our batteries this summer (an expensive adventure!) and in troubleshooting the root cause I did note that the grid heaters suck a lot of power when cycling. Was thinking of disconnecting the heaters as well, didn't realize there were fuses which could be pulled, where are they located? Boat is shrink wrapped now so won't be able to track down until spring.

Is the consequence of disconnecting the grid heaters just some additional smoking? no risks to the engine longterm?

They make a difference when temps are low, so I put the fuses back in this fall. I might pull the fuses again in the summer months to see if it make a difference then.

1701289196899.png
 
They make a difference when temps are low, so I put the fuses back in this fall. I might pull the fuses again in the summer months to see if it make a difference then.

View attachment 154845
Thanks for the picture! very helpful. Will also look up the article on Seaboard.
 
Just lost my port engine over temp switch when I started her up cold in 38 degree temp. Probably shorted internally. Anyone know where it’s located on the engine?
 
Well, I went hunting. I found everything but the overtemp switch. I found oil pressure sender, oil pressure alarm switch (both right behind aftercooler), temp sender (just aft of alternator) and tach pickup (on top of bell housing). But not that darn overtemp switch. Looks like I have to take off the belt guard and see if it’s somewhere near the t-stats, although I don’t see any wires coming out of that area. .
 
Well, I went hunting. I found everything but the overtemp switch. I found oil pressure sender, oil pressure alarm switch (both right behind aftercooler), temp sender (just aft of alternator) and tach pickup (on top of bell housing). But not that darn overtemp switch. Looks like I have to take off the belt guard and see if it’s somewhere near the t-stats, although I don’t see any wires coming out of that area. .
Bill - are you talking about the exhaust temp / raw water loss switch or engine coolant sender/switch?
If the engine coolant switch/sender then that is on the thermostat housing. The exhaust temp switch is on the exhaust tube. Sometimes the wire will come off that switch and lay on the exhaust tube causing the alarm.
 
Bill - are you talking about the exhaust temp / raw water loss switch or engine coolant sender/switch?
If the engine coolant switch/sender then that is on the thermostat housing. The exhaust temp switch is on the exhaust tube. Sometimes the wire will come off that switch and lay on the exhaust tube causing the alarm.
Coolant switch. I figured that’s probably where it is. But I can’t get eyes on it until I remove the belt guard. Thanks!
 
What exactly is an over temp switch? Didn’t think the 450 had any fancy switches.
 
What exactly is an over temp switch? Didn’t think the 450 had any fancy switches.
It looks just like a sender screwed into the block only it has either a NO or NC switch inside which changes states when the trigger temp or pressure is reached (depending on which kind is needed). Wired to a light or alarm.
 
Well, I found the problem. Not the switch. The lightweight relay I used for my homemade systems monitor, failed. Might need to get more robust relays.
 

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