For those who like to swim off your dock.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Steve S, Sep 26, 2019.

  1. Steve S

    Steve S Well-Known Member GOLD Sponsor

    Jun 5, 2007
    Northern IL.
    2000 400 Sedan Bridge with twin CAT 3116's

    2000 340 Sundancer - SOLD!
    210 Monaco 1987 - SOLD!
    Twin Caterpillar 3116's 350 HP straight drives
  2. Ike

    Ike Active Member

    329
    Dec 17, 2011
    Pacific Northwest
    1972 Sea Ray SRV 190 I/O
    12 Ft Rowboat
    8 Foot Sailing Dinghy
    Mercruiser 165 6cyl inline GM 250
    glad you posted this. See also https://www.electricshockdrowning.org/

    Never swim in a marina or a dock that has power to it. Do not swim off a boat that is running a generator or hooked up to shore power.
     
    Captn TJ likes this.
  3. El Capitan

    El Capitan Active Member

    470
    Jul 9, 2014
    Chicago IL./Vero Beach, Fl
    1970 SRV 180 w 2.5L Mercruiser.
    2000 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
    120HP Mercruiser
    Yep. And don’t dock an IO outdrive next to a boat leaking electrical current into the water at his slip, you’ll lose your drives.
     
    BEH likes this.
  4. juggernaut1

    juggernaut1 Active Member

    902
    Apr 19, 2015
    Perth, Western Australia
    2006 38 Sundancer
    8.1S / ZF 63V Drives
    I must confess my family and I swim in our marina all the time. We have RCD switches on the dock pedestals in Australia.

    I also had to have RCD switches installed on my boat to meet our regulations. One was installed where the shore power comes into the boat and the other on the generator power feed to the rest of the boat.

    The previous owner had a 240 volt outlet installed in the transom locker for the electric BBQ and that also has an RCD switch.

    I've not heard of any know electricutions in Australian marinas. Am I safe from electricution?
     
  5. Stee6043

    Stee6043 Well-Known Member

    Jun 1, 2015
    West Michigan
    1997 Sundancer 400
    7.4L Gassers
    Running generator??? Hmmm...I feel like 98.3% of the folks I know do this all the time, myself included. If we're swimming in the cove the generator is likely running.
     
  6. copb8tx

    copb8tx Well-Known Member

    Jan 26, 2008
    Lake Texoma, TX
    2005 420 Sundancer
    T-8.1S Horizons
    Yah, the no generator thing is a no-go. We've been swimming around boats running generators for the last 30+ years and I've never heard a hint of an issue. However the dock swimming warning is well justified.
     
    quality time and Brent Nutting like this.
  7. Captn TJ

    Captn TJ Active Member

    829
    Sep 19, 2017
    Catawba Island, Oh
    2005 280DA
    Raymarine E80
    5.0 with Bravo 3
    Keep in mind that Electric Shock Drownings are most prevalent in fresh water. Our Marina, here on Lake Erie, has signs posted everywhere - no swimming, no other water activities, i.e. paddleboarding. 2 years ago there was a drowning at an Island close to us as a result of ESD.
     
  8. Boat Guy

    Boat Guy Well-Known Member

    Is that last flowchart image blurry in the article?
     
  9. Steve S

    Steve S Well-Known Member GOLD Sponsor

    Jun 5, 2007
    Northern IL.
    2000 400 Sedan Bridge with twin CAT 3116's

    2000 340 Sundancer - SOLD!
    210 Monaco 1987 - SOLD!
    Twin Caterpillar 3116's 350 HP straight drives
    Yes... it is not your eyes... LOL
     
  10. Third Edition

    Third Edition Active Member

    335
    Apr 9, 2017
    NE Florida
    360 Sundancer 2002
    T-8.1L V-drives
    Fresh water conducts electricity more than salt. For what it's worth.
     
  11. Ike

    Ike Active Member

    329
    Dec 17, 2011
    Pacific Northwest
    1972 Sea Ray SRV 190 I/O
    12 Ft Rowboat
    8 Foot Sailing Dinghy
    Mercruiser 165 6cyl inline GM 250
    in theory yes, if the RCDs are wired correctly, and working properly. But why trust your life to a device? Your dock or boat may be fine, but the one next door may not be.

    As for my comment about not swimming off a boat with generators running, That has more to do with carbon monoxide poisoning than ESD. There have been numerous instances of people being poisoned by generator exhaust while swimming near a boat with a generator running. And I know of one case in which a person was killed while swimming near a boat with the generator running due to faulty wiring on the boat.

    And the comments about having done it for years with no problem are also the same kind of comments I used to see in fatal boating accident reports.
     
  12. Boat Guy

    Boat Guy Well-Known Member

    I contacted them and they made it a "linkable" PDF
     
  13. paulswagelock

    paulswagelock Well-Known Member

    Oct 25, 2010
    pa
    2018 SDX 270 OB 300 Verado
    Verado 300
    Actually, it does not and that is why freshwater is the problem. In salt water, the water is a better conductor than a human body so it goes around. In freshwater, the body is a better conductor so it goes through and electrocutes.
    In saltwater, stray current tends to go to earth through the water, in fresh water, your outdrive is the better path to ground.
     
    Todd320 and Chris-380 like this.
  14. Ike

    Ike Active Member

    329
    Dec 17, 2011
    Pacific Northwest
    1972 Sea Ray SRV 190 I/O
    12 Ft Rowboat
    8 Foot Sailing Dinghy
    Mercruiser 165 6cyl inline GM 250
    All of this discussion is why it is essential to check your electrical system at least annually especially if you have made any changes, upgrades, added equipment. etc. Keeping the integrity of the grounding wire (the green wire), and not accidentally reversing polarity, is essential. We all like to add new and improved equipment, especially in Spring after a long winter, get the boat fitted out and in the water. Checking the electrical system should be on your Spring check list. Not only to prevent ESD, but also to prevent stray current corrosion (there goes your outdrive), and prevent electrical fires.
     
    Captn TJ likes this.
  15. Charlesoceanone

    Charlesoceanone Active Member PLATINUM Sponsor

    214
    Dec 14, 2014
    Harbor Shores Marina, St Joseph, Michigan
    2009 52DB
    QSM11
    I was always trained to not swim in marinas for the obvious reasons. When I went to visit Belmont Harbor in Chicago everyone was swimming off the docks. When I said something to the dockers there they acted as if I was ignorant. Scared me but haven’t heard of anyone dying there either.
     
  16. Captn TJ

    Captn TJ Active Member

    829
    Sep 19, 2017
    Catawba Island, Oh
    2005 280DA
    Raymarine E80
    5.0 with Bravo 3
    Nope you aren't ignorant - they're just lucky. Here's an article on the Put-In-Bay drowning. https://www.cleveland.com/metro/2017/06/teens_electric_shock_drowning.html
     
  17. El Capitan

    El Capitan Active Member

    470
    Jul 9, 2014
    Chicago IL./Vero Beach, Fl
    1970 SRV 180 w 2.5L Mercruiser.
    2000 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
    120HP Mercruiser
    So how do hull cleaning divers survive?
     
    joeyleggz likes this.
  18. Captn TJ

    Captn TJ Active Member

    829
    Sep 19, 2017
    Catawba Island, Oh
    2005 280DA
    Raymarine E80
    5.0 with Bravo 3
    They're in salt water. Don't think I ever heard of divers in the the Great Lakes cleaning bottoms. - no need.
     
  19. Third Edition

    Third Edition Active Member

    335
    Apr 9, 2017
    NE Florida
    360 Sundancer 2002
    T-8.1L V-drives
    Thanks for setting me straight.
     
  20. FastMarkA

    FastMarkA Member

    280
    Jul 12, 2010
    Chicago
    2015 Sunseeker Portofino 40
    Volvo Penta D6-330
    There's very much a need to have hull cleanings in the Great Lakes; we have several divers in Chicago.

    I'm not quite sure what precautions they take to avoid electrocution, if any at all.

    I believe it's more the exception than the rule that people in the water get electrocuted. I liken it to swimming in the ocean and being attacked by a shark. The chances are excellent that nothing is going to chomp onto your leg, but...there is a chance.
     
    insfnds likes this.

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