Zumwalt, the Navy's next destroyer

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by ChuckW, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. ChuckW

    ChuckW Active Member

    Mar 6, 2009
    MA & Southwest FL
    2007 RoadKing Tri-Axle Trailer towed by a 2013 Yukon XL K2500
    496 MAG Bravo III
  2. Mike Blake

    Mike Blake Active Member

    Jan 27, 2012
    Yankeetown FL West coast
    89 340 Sundance all Raymarine.
    Gas hogs 454X2.
    That's cool!!!!
     
  3. Lord Farringdon

    Lord Farringdon New Member

    515
    Feb 19, 2010
    New Zealand
    2005 Sea Ray AJ, Raymarine C80.
    285 HP, DP-G Duo Prop Stern Drive
    From Wiki.

    Elmo Russell "Bud" Zumwalt, Jr. (November 29, 1920 – January 2, 2000) was an American naval officer and the youngest man to serve as Chief of Naval Operations. As an admiral and later the 19th Chief of Naval Operations, Zumwalt played a major role in U.S. military history, especially during the Vietnam War. A highly-decorated war veteran, Zumwalt reformed U.S. Navy personnel policies in an effort to improve enlisted life and ease racial tensions. After he retired from a 32-year Navy career, he launched an unsuccessful campaign for the U.S. Senate.


    Terry
     
  4. ChuckW

    ChuckW Active Member

    Mar 6, 2009
    MA & Southwest FL
    2007 RoadKing Tri-Axle Trailer towed by a 2013 Yukon XL K2500
    496 MAG Bravo III
    Oh sure, legitimize the name against a Naval legacy... :grin:
     
  5. Lord Farringdon

    Lord Farringdon New Member

    515
    Feb 19, 2010
    New Zealand
    2005 Sea Ray AJ, Raymarine C80.
    285 HP, DP-G Duo Prop Stern Drive
    LOL. Maybe they should call it the USS Bud!:lol:

    Terry
     
  6. Ka1oxd

    Ka1oxd New Member

    Nov 19, 2009
    Connecticut River at Portland Riverside Marina
    1988 Sea Ray 340 Sundancer
    7.4l inboards
    wiser
     
  7. Myril

    Myril Guest

    I thought Adm Zumalt was a good CNO. He issued Z grams, which he used to change policy. He tried to upgrade sailors lives, the way we lived on base and on ships. He was met with a lot of resistance from many "older" sailors.
     
  8. Woody

    Woody Well-Known Member PLATINUM Sponsor

    Nov 20, 2007
    N. Wisconsin/Lk Superior
    2005 420DA
    Cummins 6CTA8.3
    At 7billion a piece those things better be the most bada$$ ships in the universe. As a taxpayer if one of them sinks I'm gonna be pi$$ed.
     
  9. Lord Farringdon

    Lord Farringdon New Member

    515
    Feb 19, 2010
    New Zealand
    2005 Sea Ray AJ, Raymarine C80.
    285 HP, DP-G Duo Prop Stern Drive
    What's the useful life of these ships? About 20 years? Before their technology and design is outdated? That's about 350 million dollars...a year or almost a million dollars a day per ship not including operating costs which must be horrendus even with a cut down crew. We all hope these ships will not need to be used for their primary purpose but if they aren't, that's expensive deterrence no matter which way you cut it!

    Terry
     
  10. Henry Boyd

    Henry Boyd Well-Known Member PLATINUM Sponsor

    Apr 24, 2007
    Above Cape Ann
    02' 280 DA
    496 w BIII
    Useful life is potentially 40-50 years. Keep in mind most of the the stuff that wears out, or becomes obsolete, is an add on accessory. For example, the USS Missouri, one of the Iowa class battleships, was commissioned in WWII and saw service in Viet Nam and Desert Storm.

    Henry
     
  11. comsnark

    comsnark New Member

    Apr 10, 2007
    NJ Shore
    SeaRay SunSport
    5.7LX
    Key word: *potentially*

    This has held true for big, big ships like aircraft carriers and battleships; but as for the smaller and less well known ships -> The *actual* service life (not what they say when the ships are funded) is much shorter. There are very few ships from the cold war era still in the front line navy.
     
  12. comsnark

    comsnark New Member

    Apr 10, 2007
    NJ Shore
    SeaRay SunSport
    5.7LX
    duplicate
     

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