Z5 Wake Tower

Discussion in 'Sport Boats' started by Steve Craig, Oct 3, 2016.

  1. Steve Craig

    Steve Craig Member

    423
    Jul 26, 2011
    Saint John, N.B.
    '07 260 Sundeck
    6.2l & Bravo III
    Have a pair of rubber turn knobs moulded over 3/8" bolts on the rear tower supports.
    Bolts are seized but knobs will turn with a strap wrench on them. Thinking they have a hex head on the bolt moulded into the knob.
    I have replacements & anti-seize to go with them.

    Anyone ever have one of these apart ?
    Like to know what I'll find once I cut the rubber knob off.
    Hoping to get a socket over the hex-head bolt.

    Thank You
     
  2. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    I have not had one apart and don't know what's underneath. But your guess sounds good to me! At this point, though, it doesn't really matter since the rubber is turning. Unless some PB Blaster can loosen things enough to allow it to work. But often, once a handle starts spinning, it's pretty much done. Cut it off - if there's no bolt head, you can at least get a pair of vise grips or channel locks on the stud.
     
  3. Steve Craig

    Steve Craig Member

    423
    Jul 26, 2011
    Saint John, N.B.
    '07 260 Sundeck
    6.2l & Bravo III
    Thanks Dennis,
    Yes, I can feel what I believe are the flats on the hex head as the rubber turns. Once it's off I may get more access to the threads with the PB.
    -1 C here this morning, might put it off until Spring + add it the the growing list.
     
  4. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    The list never seems to get smaller, does it?
     
  5. Steve Craig

    Steve Craig Member

    423
    Jul 26, 2011
    Saint John, N.B.
    '07 260 Sundeck
    6.2l & Bravo III
    Dennis,
    Had a bit of fun with this.
    1-cut rubber & plastic knobs off to access the hex head on the bolt.
    2-proceeded to twist off both hex head bolts leaving the bolt itself in the aluminum frame work.
    3-got the lower arms off & was able to to fold the tower down for storage.
    4- soaked the bolts another week with PB Blaster & started working on them.
    5-put double hex nuts on the bolt ends & locked them together on the bench.
    6- applied heat from a propane torch after a few good square blows from a hammer.
    7-bolts finally gave an initial squeek after half an hour.
    8-got them out & chased the threads with a 3/8" tap.
    9-put the new bolts in with a liberal dose of anti-seize.
    10-reminder to self to turn the bolts in & out every year.
     
  6. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    Unfortunately, I can relate all too well to what you went through! :smt101 That first little "soft" give where the bolt head moves just a little bit, but you realize the actual bolt doesn't... Yuck.

    I'm glad you posted back with your results and that you defeated the ugly corrosion monster, in the end!

    But....... what type of anti-seize did you use? The issue, to begin with, was partly due to the dissimilar metals of the bolt and the tower. Many anti-seize formulas have metals in them. You wouldn't want to add MORE dissimilar metals. Suggestion: Check out a product called Tef-Gel. It's not cheap, but I have yet to find it's equal.
     
  7. Steve Craig

    Steve Craig Member

    423
    Jul 26, 2011
    Saint John, N.B.
    '07 260 Sundeck
    6.2l & Bravo III
    I used some surplus Penetrox I had laying in the garage. It's a coating applied to large Nu-Al (aluminum alloy) cabling inserted into tin plated lugs on a breaker or distribution panel mains. I've gone back to old projects 20 years later & no corrosion, everything comes apart easily with hand tools.
     
  8. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    OK, good. I have no experience with that product, but from your statement it sounds like it will more than satisfy the requirements! And, yes... your #10 is an excellent point.
     

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