thru hull adhesive

Discussion in 'Sport Boats' started by Bandor, Feb 7, 2018.

  1. Bandor

    Bandor New Member

    11
    Jan 29, 2018
    2000 Sea Ray 180BR
    3.0
    anyone ever tried this loctite thru hull adhesive.. I have used loctite brand allot but curious on the thru hull stuff
     

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  2. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    I have not. But what are you wanting to seal?
     
  3. ttmott

    ttmott Well-Known Member GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 3, 2012
    Space Coast Florida
    2006 52 Sedan Bridge
    Cummins QSM11
    I believe that is a polyether adhesive not a polyurethane. Great for water but poor for any hydrocarbons like oil and fuel. You may not desire for hull bottom through-hulls that can be exposed to oily bilge water. I would doubt you would ever have a problem but ....
     
  4. sailquik

    sailquik New Member

    13
    Apr 11, 2017
    L550 Fly
    Cat C12.9
    I'm old fashioned. 3M 5200 for anything below the waterline. 5200 fast cure is cure time is an issue. Use gloves - it gets everywhere.

    Soudaflex and Bostik have some similar products, but I'd rather go with what I know.
     
    Curtis and quality time like this.
  5. Bandor

    Bandor New Member

    11
    Jan 29, 2018
    2000 Sea Ray 180BR
    3.0
    this is for screws to attach stabilizers. should go all the way through just needing to do the screw holes.
     
  6. NotHerDecision

    NotHerDecision Well-Known Member PLATINUM Sponsor GOLD Sponsor

    Jun 28, 2016
    Houston, Texas
    2001 Sea Ray 460 Sundancer
    2014 Seadoo 155 LTD
    2105 Seadoo 130 SE
    2013 Mercury Dinghy
    Cummins 6CTA 8.3L
  7. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    Stabilizers... like trim tabs?

    OK, well the BEST way to do this is to drill the holes for the screws oversize, fill with thickened epoxy, then redrill your proper pilot holes and use a good sealant (not 3M5200). But, short of that, I don't think there's any need to try and reinvent the wheel by using (at least to me) a product with an unknown track record for this purpose. For me (and this is just my opinion from using the stuff for 20 years), I would use BoatLife LifeCalk. But that's not to say there aren't other good options.
     
  8. Bandor

    Bandor New Member

    11
    Jan 29, 2018
    2000 Sea Ray 180BR
    3.0
    what type of epoxy are you using?
     
  9. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    Any brand of epoxy resin can work. But assuming you are new to using it (otherwise you probably wouldn't ask?) then the easiest thing to use is the West System (note, this has nothing to do with West Marine). It's more expensive, but is overall simpler to use (and a great website with "how-to's").

    Another tip... if you're not going to use epoxy, slightly chamfer the drilled hole so the screw threads don't touch the gelcoat otherwise you might get some gel cracking now, or down the road. It also gives a larger area for sealant. If you use the epoxy, chamfer both sides of the hole (a little larger than above) before filling with epoxy to create an 'hour-glass' looking 'plug' of epoxy... makes it even stronger.
     
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  10. ttmott

    ttmott Well-Known Member GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 3, 2012
    Space Coast Florida
    2006 52 Sedan Bridge
    Cummins QSM11
    Why not 5200? It's permanent, an adhesive, and a sealant; a tenacious bedding compound that is perfect for trim tab mounting. LifeCaulk is a polysulfide sealant which is great for above and below waterline sealing however does not classify as an adhesive. Either will suffice but I would prefer the permanence of the 5200.
     
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  11. KevinC

    KevinC Active Member

    783
    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    If for any reason the installation may need to be serviced then I would recommend 4200 over 5200. An example would be a below waterline through hull fitting that may need to be replaced or serviced in the future.

    -Kevin
     
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  12. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    LifeCalk has approximately the adhesive power of 3M 4200. The reason I wouldn't use 5200 in this case is entirely because it IS so strong. The adhesive property of 5200 to gelcoat is actually stronger than that of the gelcoat to the fiberglass. In a situation like this, we're not looking for a permanent bond - we really don't need the adhesive power of 5200. If you ever needed to remove the trim tab (damage, for example), you'd likely do damage to the gelcoat in the process. Don't get me wrong, 5200 is great stuff, but it should only be used in areas where there is no anticipation of possible removal in the future - the hull to deck bond would be a good place to use it. I know we can google and see just how fond many people are of it - but be careful of what you read on the internet as much of it is based hearsay. From experience, it's the wrong application here.
     
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  13. ttmott

    ttmott Well-Known Member GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 3, 2012
    Space Coast Florida
    2006 52 Sedan Bridge
    Cummins QSM11
    And that is fine however through hulls, trim-tabs, and the like are permanent installations that should require no removal for the life of the vessel/component. On the other hand things that may require re-bedding like portlites and hatches I would agree a pliable bedding compound or other similar are more applicable. We installed some rather large shaft struts a while back and bedded them in 5200 then thru-bolted; are these not permanent installations because they had threaded fasteners? I prefer 5200 for all these permanent sealing installations. It is a no questions need to be asked sealant/compound. With that said they do make release agents to allow disassembly of 5200, 4200 and other polyurethane adhesive assemblies. Seems like my experience is different.
     
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  14. KevinC

    KevinC Active Member

    783
    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    My experiences do differ - I have seen transducers fail, fittings crack and need to be replaced and it is certainly not out of the question that trim tabs could get damaged. It's 4200 for me on these items.

    I do agree that if we are adding true structural components that they would probably best served by 5200 if under the waterline.

    I also have not had any experience with the release agents but have heard that they do work well.

    -Kevin
     
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  15. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    Mott, for what it's worth, my post where I said "not 3M5200" was NOT directed at you - it's just something I usually mention when talking about sealants since 5200 tends to get overused and/or over-recommended.

    Things like trim tabs (purpose of this thread) and thru-hulls are definitely not "lifetime" - I've had to replace too many of those. Basically, anything that get's it's primary holding power from screws or bolts doesn't need the "superman" extra help of 5200. It's really not going to "seal" any better than other products, either. As far as the struts go that you mentioned, I don't have enough hands-on experience with that to offer anything one way or the other.

    I am aware of the release agents, but so far have never had to worry about trying it out (luckily?). Have you ever personally used it? The reason I ask is that what I've read about seems to state that it's a very tedious task of cutting the 5200 with a razor blade, spraying the release agent into the cut/slit, then trying to wedge the two pieces apart (some things could be darn near impossible to wedge), then cutting and spraying, then wedging, repeat, repeat, repeat.

    On another forum, someone mentioned that this month's issue of Boating magazine had a really good article on sealants. I didn't read it, but a number of people said it was very informative.
     
  16. Creekwood

    Creekwood Well-Known Member GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 26, 2009
    Oakville and Georgian Bay, Ontario
    '97 330 Sundancer
    2X 454 w/ vDrives
    Considering how a through hull transducer gets mounted (especially a flush mount), I cannot imagine how much damage you would inflict trying to remove it later if it was installed with 5200. You'd probably be better off drilling a new hole and leaving the old one in place. 4200 for me on that install (and in spring I am installing a new transducer and will be using 4200)
     
  17. KWB

    KWB New Member

    12
    Oct 11, 2017
    340 Sundancer 1987
    twin 454 mercruisers
    I just installed a new through hull transducer. The yard man told me to use 4200. was a good choice. getting out the old one was a bit of a chore. but not to bad. Just used a nice sharp flat chisel and tap around the flange. then cut the whole flange off with a flat saw. then tap with a hammer. ( was not saving the old transducer) and it popped right out. He also said if it didn't pop out to use a hole saw the same size and drill it out. glad i didn't have to do that.
     
  18. Bandor

    Bandor New Member

    11
    Jan 29, 2018
    2000 Sea Ray 180BR
    3.0
    Lots of great info here. Thanks to all those who responded. I decided to use the 3m4200. I like the way this stuff worked out.

    Thanks again!!
     

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