seaworthy searays?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by berth control, Jul 9, 2009.

  1. berth control

    berth control New Member

    886
    Nov 16, 2008
    Saugatuck, MI
    1985 270 Sundancer
    3.7 liter Mercruisers
    I was just reading the "following seas" section of this month's Boating mag, and it talk's about Europe's RCD rating that shows the level of seaworthiness for different boats right on the capacities tag. Apparently there are classes A, B, C, and D with A being the most seaworthy. I was wondering what size/style boats fall into what class. Anyone know?
     
  2. Presentation

    Presentation Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor

    Oct 3, 2006
    Wisconsin - Winnebago Pool chain of lakes
    280 Sundancer, Westerbeke MPV generator
    twin 5.0's w/BIII drives
    We have the same thing. Its in the manual. Let me see if I can find more.
     
  3. chuck1

    chuck1 Super Moderator TECHNICAL Contributor PLATINUM Sponsor

    Oct 3, 2006
    North GA Mountains
    Looking For Next One
    Looking For Next One
    Check out your manual. I know my 240SD has a section about it.

    A. Ocean​
    Wind speed: above 40 knots (46 mph)
    Wave height: above 4 meters (13 feet)
    Boat may be used for extended ocean
    voyages.​
    B. Offshore​
    Maximum wind speed: 40 knots (46 mph)
    Maximum wave height: 4 meters (13 feet)
    Boat can be used offshore, but not for
    extended ocean voyages.​
    C. Inshore​
    Maximum wind speed: 27 knots (31 mph)
    Maximum wave height: 2 meters (6.5 feet)
    Boat use is limited to coastal waters, large
    bays, estuaries, lakes and rivers.​
    D. Sheltered waters​
    Maximum wind speed: 15 knots (18 mph)
    Maximum wave height: 0.5 meters (1.5 feet)
    Boat use is limited to small lakes, rivers and canals.
     
  4. chuck1

    chuck1 Super Moderator TECHNICAL Contributor PLATINUM Sponsor

    Oct 3, 2006
    North GA Mountains
    Looking For Next One
    Looking For Next One
    Looks like Presentation bet me to it.
     
  5. Presentation

    Presentation Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor

    Oct 3, 2006
    Wisconsin - Winnebago Pool chain of lakes
    280 Sundancer, Westerbeke MPV generator
    twin 5.0's w/BIII drives
    Looks like Chuck had all the details.

    We are a team buddy.

    Good Job!



    Our boat is “B” rated but I don’t wish to find out how well it does in 13’ waves.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2009
  6. berth control

    berth control New Member

    886
    Nov 16, 2008
    Saugatuck, MI
    1985 270 Sundancer
    3.7 liter Mercruisers
    That's what I was really wondering, what class certain size boats fall into. I wonder if yours is about the smallest B rated Sundancer. Thanks for the answers guys!
     
  7. Presentation

    Presentation Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor

    Oct 3, 2006
    Wisconsin - Winnebago Pool chain of lakes
    280 Sundancer, Westerbeke MPV generator
    twin 5.0's w/BIII drives
    Going from memory, the new 260 Sundancer with the integral swim platform is the smallest Sundancer with the B rating.

    Once you get to the older 260 Sundancer with the bolt on swim platform the rating goes to C.
     
  8. tobnpr

    tobnpr New Member

    Nov 12, 2006
    New Port Richey, Florida
    1988 300 DA
    tw 350's w/ Alphas
    Is this "rating" assigned by someone @ SR, or is this from an independent agency?
    I'm surprised no starving trial lawyers have taken a 260 or 280 out in gale force winds and 13' seas, sunk it, and sued Sea Ray.

    IMO, "certifying" a boat that size as "suitable" for those conditions is irresponsible at best...wonder what genius came up with this one.
     
  9. ChuckW

    ChuckW Active Member

    Mar 6, 2009
    MA & Southwest FL
    2007 RoadKing Tri-Axle Trailer towed by a 2013 Yukon XL K2500
    496 MAG Bravo III
    Yep my 260 is B Rated. Wouldn't want to take on 13' seas. Been in 6-8' with it and it wasn't fun.
     
  10. Asureyez

    Asureyez New Member

    Apr 22, 2007
    Ft. Lauderdale, Fl.
    Sea Ray 460 Sundancer Hardtop 2001 - SOLD
    Cummins 450 Diesels
    13 ft seas isn't the issue, its the frequency and are they breaking or not.

    Generally, the designation of "Boat can be used offshore, but not for
    extended ocean voyages." Means just long enough to get to safe waters but not passage making in those conditions.

    13 ft seas is just about the max height in non breaking condition that a pleasure craft of Sea ra proportions can make headway. After that forget it, turn tail and run home.
     
  11. Converse48

    Converse48 Well-Known Member GOLD Sponsor

    Nov 20, 2006
    Chesapeake Bay
    2010 McKinna 57 Pilothouse
    QSM-11
    Those ratings are meaningless. They essentially boil down to:
    D: canoes and kayaks
    C: open boats (i.e. bowriders and/or daysailers)
    B: Power boats (at least those that aren't "ships")
    A: Sailboats and Ships

    If you want to get a sailing board all riled up, tell them that you're going to sail your 32' Catalina trans-Atlantic because it is "A Rated". Hilarity will surely ensue.
     
  12. islandhopper00

    islandhopper00 Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    Lake Norman (Denver) NC
    240 Sundancer
    5.0L 260hp, BIII outdrive
    I found out this year the 240 da can handle breaking 6-8 footers. It was uncomfortable and very intimidating, but doable. I encountered the seas crossing onto the Little Bahama Bank during my annual island trip. Most of the crossing was like a lake, untill we got to the bank. Experience behind the wheel is valuable to say the least.
    At times I would say my little boat did better than some of the larger boats in the weather swells. A 44 sea ray express bridge foundered pretty hard as did a trawler tug. I seemed to make better head way and got to the harbor entrance ahead of alot of the bigger boats. Go figure.
    Even my cousin in a 2860 Regal fought pretty hard. My self and my other cousin in a 240 Chap seemed to do fine.
     
  13. tobnpr

    tobnpr New Member

    Nov 12, 2006
    New Port Richey, Florida
    1988 300 DA
    tw 350's w/ Alphas
    C'mon...
    You're really saying that a 24' cuddy handles big seas better than a 44'?

    Guess I've been wrong all along thinking I'm safer 50 miles offshore in a 39'...
     
  14. islandhopper00

    islandhopper00 Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    Lake Norman (Denver) NC
    240 Sundancer
    5.0L 260hp, BIII outdrive
    No, I'm saying in different seas and different captains with varing levels of experience a small boat can do well. It surprised me the 44 was having trouble. The captain was complaining of the waves breaking over the foredeck and washing the bridge over. I guess, do to the wave period, his boat was long enough to poke the bow into the next wave rather than over it.

    Here are some pics I could take while trying to drive.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  15. islandhopper00

    islandhopper00 Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    Lake Norman (Denver) NC
    240 Sundancer
    5.0L 260hp, BIII outdrive
    Here is the pic of the 44 pulling into Grand Bahamas West End "behind me". Note I'm docked already. Just saying.
    [​IMG]
     
  16. AKBASSKING

    AKBASSKING Active Member

    Apr 13, 2008
    SE Alaska Summer/Columbia River winter
    1988 Yacht Fisher
    Twin 375hp Cat 3208 T/A
    Wonder what my 300DB is rated?

    It will be interesting to see how she handles when I take my trip up the "inside" passage" to PWS. It's a long stretch of open Northern Pacific Ocean once you leave Glacier Bay and head towards PWS and Cordova.
     
  17. jason78

    jason78 Active Member TECHNICAL Contributor SILVER Sponsor

    Sep 3, 2008
    Fort Mill, SC / Lake Wylie
    1997 20 Outrage
    200 Merc Offshore
    Yeah, I don't know about those ratings. My 225WE is "B" rated. I don't think I would want to be in it with anything close to 13 foot waves! :smt009
     
  18. bw76273

    bw76273 New Member

    111
    Feb 14, 2008
    Lake Texoma, Texas
    2007 260 DA
    5.7 MPI Bravo 3
    5E Generator
    My hat is off to salt water guys!:thumbsup: Those are some really good pics, helps me understand what you guys are talking about now.
    I though it was bad enough trying to stay out of the wake of our friends 44' Cruisers Sedan Bridge throwing out some 4-5 foot rollers as he came by us. :smt100
     
  19. Odyssey

    Odyssey Active Member

    Jan 8, 2007
    Delray Beach Florida
    44EB
    CAT 3116
    When we all tried to get over to Port Lucaya on Memorial Day, Mike with his 48 sedan bridge and I with my 44 EB left Hillsboro inlet in what I would describe as 4 -6 foot seas (occassional 7 footers). It was uncomfortable and didn't take us long to decide to turn around. I wasn't about to endure those conditions for 6 hours. I do not however remember waves coming over the bow.

    As Chad said, the frequency of the waves make a big difference as well as the speed and direction of the vessel.

    Randy
     
  20. Tail Chaser 661

    Tail Chaser 661 New Member

    742
    Jan 23, 2009
    So Calif Offshore Islands
    Furuno Navnet radar/chartplotter, fish finder, bait tank, 85 Gal main fuel tank, 75gal aux tank.
    Merc 8.1 Mag 375 HP / Bravo III,4 blade prop. 28mph at 3200rpm.
    Closely spaced wind waves like that really suck.
    Ive got into 12fters twice crossing some 30 mile channels. Once at night. Lucky they were just short of breaking waves. Chopped the throttle back as the bow went vertical sitting the bow softly down on the backside. My female passenger was having fun :wow: Twice was enough for me. Ive mostly changed my crossing times now. These overhead swells I didnt even need to turn into. Messed up my fishing though:smt013
    Since my engine and tank is out. I'm doubling and adding stringers to my boat. On the 85 26'DA. Sea Ray only glassed one side of the stringers in the ER room.:huh: Going 100 miles offshore, I'm expecting 10fters to be the norm.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2009

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