Oil change before winterizing or in the spring?

Discussion in 'Winterizing' started by rh320, Oct 12, 2018.

  1. rh320

    rh320 Member

    101
    Mar 2, 2018
    Chesapeake Bay
    2005 320 Sundancer
    350 Mercruiser
    Another question regarding winterizing; Is it better to change the oil before winterizing so fresh oil is sitting in it all winter or wait until the spring so it starts the season with fresh oil?
     
  2. mnm99

    mnm99 Well-Known Member

    Oct 2, 2015
    Long Island
    2004 340 SeaRay Sundancer
    Twin 8.1 Merc
    before
     
  3. douglee25

    douglee25 Well-Known Member

    Jan 13, 2008
    Dallas, TX
    Cruisers 3575
    Twin 7.4l
    Twin 7.4l
    I've usually done it before. I believe they claim it's good to change it to remove the acids and unburnt fuel. With that said, I may do the opposite this year due to lack of hours and time.
     
  4. Golfman25

    Golfman25 Active Member

    190
    Sep 12, 2009
    IL
    281
    V8
    If you're going to do it, do it before winterizing. The are acids and such in used oil.
     
  5. Espos4

    Espos4 Active Member

    592
    Jan 1, 2017
    Long Island NY
    2007 240 Sundeck
    350 MAG Bravo 3 W/DTS
    Same here, change it before winter storage. Then I run the motor 15 minutes or so to make sure the fresh oil makes its way into the lifters.
     
    northshore likes this.
  6. Siboatguy

    Siboatguy Active Member GOLD Sponsor

    233
    Mar 28, 2016
    Holmdel,NJ
    2005 Sea Ray 320 Sundancer
    Twins V-Drives
    2017 5.7 Mercruisers
    I always do it after because of condensation issues i worry about... Don't want to run all year on oil thats been sitting for 6 to 8 months....
     
  7. Stee6043

    Stee6043 Well-Known Member

    Jun 1, 2015
    West Michigan
    1997 Sundancer 400
    7.4L Gassers
    Before for me...
     
  8. Wylie_Tunes

    Wylie_Tunes Active Member

    605
    Oct 26, 2012
    Lake Wylie NC area
    N/A
    N/A
    now. Used oil is acidic and slowly eats away at the soft components like bearings.
     
  9. northern

    northern Well-Known Member

    Jan 17, 2007
    West coast Vancouver to Alaska
    380 Aft Cabin 1989 GPS and Charts by Nobeltec
    Twin 454 strait shaft
    We change oil every 100 hours or so. If I get close to 100 interval at end of season I change it if not I wait until next year and change it when we get to 100 or so. This year I changed oil in early spring, mid summer and when the boat went to bed it had less than 40 hours on the oil. Generator I change every fall as we only put 50 or so hours on it.
     
  10. white glove boat

    white glove boat Member

    44
    Aug 29, 2016
    Texas
    2001 310 DA T 350 mag Horizon 63 IV V drives( 2007), C80 gps 4kw Radome with overlay,
    2007 Mercruiser 350 mag Horizons and ZF Hurth 63IV V drives 18"x19" Nibral medium cup props
    I'm for before winter block up, I would view this the same way as preparing a customer for any long block time . Block time is tough on machinery but I think its minimized with fresh ,clean oil . I also perform a very thorough fogging through spark plugs and intakes .I think despite condensation potential do to swings in temperature and humidity which run wild here in Texas over the winter, clean oil before is the lesser of two evils; combustion byproducts or condensation. Honestly I stress more over fuel and the havoc it wreaks on fuel injection systems thanks to ethanol
     
  11. sbw1

    sbw1 Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2006
    West Michigan
    This is listed in my signature
    This is listed in my signature
    Before.
     
  12. white glove boat

    white glove boat Member

    44
    Aug 29, 2016
    Texas
    2001 310 DA T 350 mag Horizon 63 IV V drives( 2007), C80 gps 4kw Radome with overlay,
    2007 Mercruiser 350 mag Horizons and ZF Hurth 63IV V drives 18"x19" Nibral medium cup props
    where is your hailing port sbw1 ? I am missing the seasons here in Texas but I don't miss the freeze much . Just curious about your feelings on condensation in oil during block time .
     
  13. sbw1

    sbw1 Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2006
    West Michigan
    This is listed in my signature
    This is listed in my signature
    We are located in West Michigan near Grand Rapids. We don't have concerns with condensation as most all people store inside buildings that are heated. Before that, we did store in cold, unheated buildings and the generally accepted wisdom was to change oil at fall layup. Condensation is more of an issue here when boats are stored outside and subject to solar heating during the day, followed by freezing temps during the nighttime. Unheated storage buildings cool down slowly in the fall, and once they are cold in the winter tend to stay cold until the gradual warm up in the spring. We never experienced any moisture issues with our boats that were in cold buildings due to the absence of large temperature fluctuations. I did see problems such as mildew with boats that stayed outside during the winter months. I suppose there could have been condensation in the crankcases of these boats but the thinking was still to layup with fresh oil. Make sense to you?
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2018
    Blueone likes this.
  14. rh320

    rh320 Member

    101
    Mar 2, 2018
    Chesapeake Bay
    2005 320 Sundancer
    350 Mercruiser
    Thanks for the responses! The general consensus seems to be changing in the fall is better. Should an oil stabilizer be used as well? According to west marine oil stabilizers description, it coats the cylinders and other parts to prevent corrosion so is fogging the motor really necessary?
     
  15. Wylie_Tunes

    Wylie_Tunes Active Member

    605
    Oct 26, 2012
    Lake Wylie NC area
    N/A
    N/A
    Fogging through the spark plug holes or intake, coat areas the oil does not, so I would consider an oil additive to be doing its job in a different part of the engine. With that said, if you are using dyno-oil, im not sure an extra oil additive is needed. Will it hurt? doubt it. For full-syn, extra coating might be good, as syn tens to run off faster then dyno-oil. Id first want to make sure the additive is compatible first, though.
     
  16. white glove boat

    white glove boat Member

    44
    Aug 29, 2016
    Texas
    2001 310 DA T 350 mag Horizon 63 IV V drives( 2007), C80 gps 4kw Radome with overlay,
    2007 Mercruiser 350 mag Horizons and ZF Hurth 63IV V drives 18"x19" Nibral medium cup props
    yes makes sense
     
  17. Cj2law

    Cj2law New Member

    28
    Oct 31, 2014
    St louis
    2003 Sea Ray 240SD
    350 Mag w/ Bravo III
    My mechanic told me to always do it before. Two reasons first acids in used oil second to make sure there is no water in your oil. Better to have the winter to do major mechanical than in summer when you should be enjoying your boat.
     
  18. MonacoMike

    MonacoMike Well-Known Member PLATINUM Sponsor

    Sep 15, 2009
    Indiana lakes and Lake Michigan
    2000 Cruisers 3870
    97 270 Sundancer
    85 Sea Ray Monaco 197
    8.2 Mercs,
    7.4 BII
    260hp Alpha 1
    Some great responses in here. Thanks,

    MM
     
  19. Leardriver

    Leardriver Member

    147
    May 24, 2016
    Denver, CO
    2004 270 Sundeck 8.1 Bravo III
    5.0, 5.7, 6.2 8.1 Bravo III over the years
    I don't associate oil changes with any season. Change it on schedule. These mysterious acids in used oil have been talked about for decades, no one has ever seen them or noticed their affects. Winterizing to me is freeze-proofing, as long as you also meet your maintenance needs at other times. I used my boat once this year, for 1.3 engine hours. I'm not going to change the oil.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2018
    gerryb likes this.
  20. ThorSen

    ThorSen Member

    115
    Aug 17, 2017
    Western North Carolina
    2018 SPX 190 OUTBOARD 150
    150 4-stroke Mercury outboard
    No offense but, that’s just plain uninformed. Not only are acids present, they are one of THE PRIMARY ingredients used to measure engine oil degradation.

    It’s science ... https://res.mdpi.com/lubricants/lub...ubricants-03-00054.pdf?filename=&attachment=1

    If this is too much, chemical engineers who work for Joe Gibbs Racing have published numerous studies, with pictures.

    Pertinent excerpts:

    The main conclusion of this work was that ageing and engine wear lead to acid formation and antioxidant species depletion.

    Viscosity, carbon residue, acid number, amount of pentane insolubles and mass losses during the test were chosen as the key parameters for the evaluation of oxidation stability of the oils.

    Oxidation is the primary mechanism by which oil degradation occurs in an engine. The process of oxidation occurs in three stages. The first stage corresponds to the depletion of antioxidant and antiwear additives, followed by oxidative degradation of the base oil [2,3]. During this stage, the formation of polar organic compounds in oil (such as ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters) is more pronounced.

    Engine oil ageing can be characterized by different markers like apparent activation energy of decomposition, oxidation, sulfation and nitration indices, antiwear breakdown, viscosity index, total acid number (TAN), total base number (TBN), dielectric constant and soot deposition.

    Total base number (TBN) is an indirect measure of the rate at which oil acquires acidity during ageing. Engine oils contain alkaline additives like calcium sulfonate, magnesium sulfonate, phenates and salicylates [1–3] to neutralize the acids that may be generated during oxidative degradation.
     
    techmitch likes this.

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