Jupiter Inlet

Discussion in 'Southeast' started by Blueone, Dec 18, 2018.

  1. Blueone

    Blueone Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Jan 24, 2007
    Lake Erie, Ohio
    2004 420 Sundancer
    Cummins 6CTA 450's
    I have seen quite a few of these mishaps and struggles getting thru this inlet lately. Is there no way to get yourself educated before going thru it first....or is this a "at your own risk" kind of thing?

    I know this video is a year old but its a good one to make my point

     
  2. Third Edition

    Third Edition Active Member

    298
    Apr 9, 2017
    NE Florida
    360 Sundancer 2002
    T-8.1L V-drives
    If it were me, I'd find someone experienced to go with me the first time. Or hire a captain to go with you.
     
  3. sbw1

    sbw1 Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2006
    West Michigan
    This is listed in my signature
    This is listed in my signature
    IMG_2098.JPG
    I learned how to do this from being on board with experienced skippers. It is not exactly the sort of thing you can read about or watch on video and then just do it. Learn by watching on board; then do it on board and then teach others how to do it. Staying on the back of the wave is generally a good strategy, although I have come in on plane more than once based upon what the seas were doing. Big following seas require experience and great care.
     
  4. MonacoMike

    MonacoMike Well-Known Member PLATINUM Sponsor

    Sep 15, 2009
    Indiana lakes and Lake Michigan
    2000 Cruisers 3870
    8.2 Mercs
    85 Sea Ray Monaco 197
    260hp Alpha 1
    Are you guys sure the drone did not cause the incident?

    MM
     
  5. tc410

    tc410 Active Member PLATINUM Sponsor

    910
    Oct 9, 2006
    Charlevoix, MI/Jupiter, FL
    2005 550DB
    MAN CRM-900
    Let me shed some local knowledge on this.

    First of all, the Jupiter Inlet is deemed a non-navigational inlet by the USCG. Proceed at your own risk and peril. There are signs when heading out that indicate “dangerous inlet local knowledge required.” There is a moving bar outside that shifts regularly but is particularly dominated northeast of the inlet. Any sort of swell action from the east or northeast pushing against an out-tide builds some crazy inbound surf.

    When this surf builds it is on a very short period and often converging from multiple directions at the same time. It is frequently difficult to gauge the sets and get in the queue on back of one. Generally once you think you have, you notice one breaking on your aft starboard corner (while inbound).

    Second - the conditions during that drone incident were actually not all that bad for this inlet. That was a bait boat and that large container in the bow is a giant live well - yes, filled with water. This boat was very bow-heavy.

    In any event, this inlet is not for the feint of heart and has claimed multiple lives. There is definitely a “pucker factor” involved here. I’ve learned through a few close calls to go out straight east, fish southward past Juno Beach (where the sailfish are known to pile up on the Juno ledge), and then come back in the Palm Beach inlet. You can spend the time cleaning up the boat northbound on the ICW....
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2019
  6. ttmott

    ttmott PhD in OCD GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 3, 2012
    Space Coast Florida
    2006 52 Sedan Bridge
    Cummins QSM11
    Timing is everything. Three or four hours after low tide or after high tide is Jupiter, Haulover, Boynton, or Sebastian. tc410 is on spot with Jupiter. They can all be challenging - We were coming back from West End, major storm behind us with 20 to 30 knot winds from the East Southeast and needed to get in Fort Pierce; tide was ripping out and even that wide inlet was rolling 8 footers. It was a commitment and no turning around.... Know the conditions and know your limits.
     
  7. Dani-Lu

    Dani-Lu Active Member SILVER Sponsor

    531
    Apr 20, 2007
    Delray Beach, Fl. / Long Island - GSB
    2001 410DA
    3126 Cats
    Definitely the drone, definitely the drone, gotta go to Kmart, gotta go to Kmart...
     
  8. joeyleggz

    joeyleggz Active Member

    493
    Jan 15, 2013
    long island
    current boat: 1997 sea ray 330 express cruiser
    twin 454's efi
    I read that this boat was taking on water and there was a problem and he was racing in the inlet that’s why the boat dove into the wake as the water shifted forward
     
  9. boatman37

    boatman37 Well-Known Member

    Jun 6, 2015
    pittsburgh
    2006 Crownline 250CR. 5.7 Merc BIII
    Previous: 1986 Sea Ray 250 Sundancer. 260 Merc Alpha 1 Gen 1
    5.7 Merc BIII
    So what is typically the best way to handle these types of scenarios? Trim up and ride the back of the next wave? The biggest I have seen on the Ohio is maybe 2'ers so not worried there but we would like to someday tow to Lake Erie for a few days. Not that I would want to be out in that type of water but what if....
     
  10. ttmott

    ttmott PhD in OCD GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 3, 2012
    Space Coast Florida
    2006 52 Sedan Bridge
    Cummins QSM11
    That is what is recommended for following seas (going with the tide current). But more important is to know and understand the inlet and it's conditions beforehand. If running with the current, keep the boat on the back of any large wave; you will have the best steerage; This is simplistic as typically, inlets can get really mixed up. Allowing a large swell to approach and overtake the boat from the rear is a dangerous situation as the boat can be turned or swamped. Cresting a large wave and moving down it's face can air out the running gear, accelerate the boat without steerage, and bury the bow / swamp the boat in the next wave or drive the boat into the channel bottom. I believe it's important to have significant engine power in reserve as there are situations where rudders, IO position, or OB position are not effective and control of the boat will depend upon the propellers. It is a very bad situation to turn the boat around in inlets that are ripping with large swells as the risk of broaching increases greatly. Running into the current and swells is the best of the situations as there is always relative boat velocity with the water and control can be maintained; with that said, inlet conditions are not typically simple flow towards the bow and the boat can assume a course of it's own mind. This is another reason why I maintain power in reserve.
    If you are unsure about an inlet (which one should never be) and need to use it, simply wait three or four hours after high or low tide; the current will subside making conditions more acceptable.
     
  11. my3sons

    my3sons Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Feb 24, 2009
    Summers- NY (Lake Erie), Winters- Somewhere Warm
    2004 400DB, Onan 9 kw Gen, Highfield RIB,
    Cummins 6CTA
    The nasty waves on lake Erie are, I think, a little different. They are caused by high wind and are more predictable because they are almost always rolling in the same direction, mostly very uniformly. Don't misunderstand, they can be big trouble but if you get caught out in a bad blow, which is rare because of good weather forecasting, but can happen, handle them as stated above. Keeping power in reserve mentioned above can't be overstated.
    The inlets are a new experience for me. I am slowly learning by using them in good conditions, listening to those more experienced (like here on CSR and on the docks) and limiting myself to "all weather" inlets that are less likely to be effected by shifting bars and shallow water. If I come to the decision that going outside on any one day would probably be doable, I stay inside and wait to learn more for a different day.
     
  12. sbw1

    sbw1 Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2006
    West Michigan
    This is listed in my signature
    This is listed in my signature
    IMG_2098.JPG I saw the most amazing seamanship on display a couple of years ago at the Grand Haven inlet. The seas were breaking over both sides of the harbor entrance making the channel completely confused. Winds were probably 25-35 with waves 15-20. The Coast Guard was either on a training mission or a search and rescue when I happened to drive by the harbor. They ran a boat out the channel in those conditions on plane at probably 20-25 knots. The boat tracked like it was on rails, and did not slow down when it reached the open waters. The boat's performance was as impressive was as the coastie driving the boat. No one else ventured out that day as conditions were terrible..
     
  13. sbw1

    sbw1 Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2006
    West Michigan
    This is listed in my signature
    This is listed in my signature
    IMG_2098.JPG IMG_3814.JPG For those who may be curious about Lake Michigan inlets, here is a pic of Grand Haven's on a windy day. Photo is by David DeHaan.
     
    Great Lakes likes this.
  14. joeyleggz

    joeyleggz Active Member

    493
    Jan 15, 2013
    long island
    current boat: 1997 sea ray 330 express cruiser
    twin 454's efi

    This is Jones Inlet Long Island New York definitely no joke In this video these gentlemen were inbound after a day of fishing came home to pretty crazy conditions ,the mouth of the inlet is very wide but there are east and west sandbars the channel itself probably should be re-dredged even at high tide there are parts of the channel that are only about 7 feet deep in any kind of rough weather when the waves part out you don’t want to be rolling over that spot or you will bottom out your boat even on a calm day wind against tide still has 3 to 4 footers to contend with I found myself in a bad situation one time About three years ago incoming 15 to 20 knot wind screaming out going current light rain ,wipers going leaving the inlet I lost my starboard wiper I could not see from all the water splashing on the windshield As I was approaching A set of 3 waves with white water curling at the top ,because I could not see my instinct was to slow down which was a critical mistake because I allowed the boat to roll over the first 7 foot standing wave and buried the nose in the next wave and water rushed up the bow pushed through the isinglass and washed through the cockpit And spun me 90 degrees beam to the waves the third wave pick me up rolled me to the port gunnel when The boat righted I nailed the throttles turn the boat and raced back in between the sets of waves spent six months analyzing that incident scared the shit out of my 12-year-old son ( with life jacket ) if it hadn’t been for my full fuel tanks and water tanks and a very low center of gravity I believe the boat would’ve been lost that day The timing was perfect for those events that happened had I not backed off the throttle the bow would’ve pushed through those waves most likely without incident
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2018
    PlayDate likes this.
  15. tc410

    tc410 Active Member PLATINUM Sponsor

    910
    Oct 9, 2006
    Charlevoix, MI/Jupiter, FL
    2005 550DB
    MAN CRM-900
    SBW1 - I’ve made the Charlevoix channel in similar conditions to your picture in a strong Northwest blow. The one major difference that can’t be experienced here on the Great Lakes is a strong outgoing tide pushing against that incoming sea. No matter how dramatic some of the pics are of Lake Michigan fury, there really is no comparison to the risk and danger of the ocean inlets mentioned throughout this thread.
     
    susanandlance likes this.
  16. Stee6043

    Stee6043 Well-Known Member

    Jun 1, 2015
    West Michigan
    1997 Sundancer 400
    7.4L Gassers
    A nice 3' day!
    The fact that you had two guys in the back of your boat without life jackets on during this attempt leaves me with a sense of WTF. One of them is your son? Sheesh man...put the camera down next time and start handing out some PFD's....yowzers....that's some scary stuff. At least for a fresh water guy :)
     
  17. joeyleggz

    joeyleggz Active Member

    493
    Jan 15, 2013
    long island
    current boat: 1997 sea ray 330 express cruiser
    twin 454's efi

    No sir this is a Video of “a” boat coming in Jones inlet.... not my boat . never would ever be videotaping while transversing Jones inlet unless I had a fixed cam.The day “we”left the inlet everybody had lifejackets on standard procedure when ocean going maybe I should have mentioned that this is not me ! Lol
     
  18. Stee6043

    Stee6043 Well-Known Member

    Jun 1, 2015
    West Michigan
    1997 Sundancer 400
    7.4L Gassers
    Ohh good! I thought you mentioned "kid" in your post and I was assuming that was you at the helm. Glad to hear you're not the guy watching his buddies on the back enjoy the ride!!!
     
  19. sbw1

    sbw1 Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2006
    West Michigan
    This is listed in my signature
    This is listed in my signature
    IMG_3815.JPG IMG_2098.JPG View attachment 63199 View attachment 63200 View attachment 63199
    Yes. I do understand there is a difference between an outgoing tide against an onshore blow. Do you by chance remember when the Captain of the Coast Guard cutter Mackinaw lost his command as a result of losing control of the ship when it was transiting the Grand Haven inlet? He slammed into the inlet wall and did severe damage to the ship and the wall. Large ships routinely drop anchor off of Grand Haven when the weather makes the inlet unnavigable. I would argue that both are dangerous, although the Florida inlets are more often dangerous due to tides, while the Great Lakes are dangerous due to stormy conditions which are less frequent. Here is a pic of one of the local lifeboats that appeared in the Grand Haven Tribune in June 2017. This was a windy day, but certainly not horrible weather. Nontheless, it required good skills.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2018
  20. boatman37

    boatman37 Well-Known Member

    Jun 6, 2015
    pittsburgh
    2006 Crownline 250CR. 5.7 Merc BIII
    Previous: 1986 Sea Ray 250 Sundancer. 260 Merc Alpha 1 Gen 1
    5.7 Merc BIII
    yeah, glad we don't have to deal with that on the Ohio....lol
     
    sbw1 likes this.

Share This Page

Show Sidebar