First Boat - Looking at 2003 24' Sundeck and 26' Sundeck

Discussion in 'Newbie Lounge - NEW' started by ohioboater, Aug 20, 2019.

  1. ohioboater

    ohioboater New Member

    16
    Aug 20, 2019
    boatless
    boatless
    (the 26' is a 2004 model year with 300+ hours, the 2003 has 500+ hours) I am also looking at a 1999 Maxum Marine 2300sr which I understand was the same Company at one point. This would be my first boat for use in Lake Erie. Recently purchased a place on a river leading to the lake, so this would dock there during the season. I have to watch how big of a boat I get because some years the water level in this particular area can get fairly shallow so where silt can become an issue, so I am told. Family of 5, looking to be able to take up to 4 or 5 guests out on top of that. We can also boat up river when lake conditions are not good. Just want to be able to pull tubes, general cruising, occasionally boat over to the islands (PIB and Kelly's). Figured open bow is best due to not really needing the boat for sleeping since we have a place and the open air space allows for more people to enjoy the trip. Thoughts? Is it kosher to post links so you all can see pics and specs?
     
  2. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    Maxum (until they were discontinued) and Bayliner were built by the same company (US Marine) - not Maxum and Sea Ray.

    All 240SD's from the year range you are looking at are 26' overall.

    Yes, you could post links.

    Hours is relatively inmaterial - and certainly 300 vs 500 makes no difference compared to each other and neither is anywhere even close to an amount to be worried about. Care/maintenance is much more important.
     
  3. ohioboater

    ohioboater New Member

    16
    Aug 20, 2019
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    boatless
  4. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    Brunswick is a "mother company" to many, many companies. Yes, they did buy US Marine and Sea Ray - but USM and SR have no relation other than that. They don't share parts, manufacturing technique or workers. Two separate companies.

    Can't really tell too much from the pictures - but if everything checks out on them, the prices all seem to be reasonable.
     
  5. Golfman25

    Golfman25 Well-Known Member

    614
    Sep 12, 2009
    IL
    281
    V8
    If you're planning on any use in lake Erie, I would recommend looking at a cuddy cabin. The open bow will be an issue in all but the most calm conditions. I have seen open bow boats go into lake Michigan, only to turn right around after they took a waver or two over the bow and soaked momma.
     
  6. ohioboater

    ohioboater New Member

    16
    Aug 20, 2019
    boatless
    boatless
    We have considered this, but a similar sized boat with a cuddy cant haul as many people unless some are in the cabin, correct? We have seen a bunch of open bows on the lake, many in the 18-20' range. You are not the first person to mention this. I take it only those in the bow risk getting wet?
     
  7. Golfman25

    Golfman25 Well-Known Member

    614
    Sep 12, 2009
    IL
    281
    V8
    Right, but have you seen them on anything but the most calm days? The great lakes can eat you up in a heartbeat. Having a bunch of people in the bow, making it bow heavy, can lead to issues if you're not careful. Go to the lake on an average day -- not calm, not 3+ footers, but 1-2 footers. See what you see.
     
  8. ColoSR

    ColoSR Member

    49
    Apr 25, 2018
    2003 Sea Ray Sundeck 220
    MX 6.2L MPI Mercruiser with 2.2 Bravo III drive
    I would put the two sea rays in front of the Maxum because sea ray is still supporting its boats, the aftermarket support is good, and you will get better fuel economy/hp with the fuel injected engines vs the carbureted 350 in the Maxum.

    Between the two Sea Ray’s I would lean towards the 240 if you are docking it at your cabin. The 240 has a capacity of 12, and the 5.7L fuel injected engine with the heavy duty Bravo III drive which puts out 300hp at the prop. The bravo III gives you better performance for water sports and is easier to drive due to the counter-rotating props. Be aware that you do have to make sure your anodes and mercathode are in good shape because the bravo III’s are prone to corrosion due to the big stainless steel props. A lift to keep it out of the water wouldn’t be a bad idea either. It appears that the 240 has the smartcraft gauges, which are a little more accurate than conventional analog gauges.

    The 220 is a great boat as well (I love mine). We have small lakes and trailer everywhere so the slightly smaller form factor was a better fit for us ( and personally I like the look of the 220 better). The 220 has a capacity of 10 and the one you linked has the 5.0L fuel injected, 260hp engine most likely with the Alpha drive. It’s a solid package, but performance isn’t what the bigger motors/bravo iii drives will do.
     
  9. ohioboater

    ohioboater New Member

    16
    Aug 20, 2019
    boatless
    boatless
    Great feedback, thanks! If the 240 owner won't come down in price some, the 220 may be my only choice, we shall see. I already have the 220 owner down to$17500, but need to buy a trailer (more for storage than anything else) I figured the Maxum wasn't the best, but the low price point is teasing me...but I have learned that you get what you pay for, with anything.
     
  10. yobub

    yobub Active Member PLATINUM Sponsor

    316
    Jul 29, 2016
    Chicago
    1998 400 Sundancer
    Cat 3116's
    I have had a different experience with runabouts on Lake Michigan. I've owned a 24' open bow for 20 years, and had a 19' for several years before that.

    The 24' handles Lake Michigan really really well. We are generally near shore in that type of boat, (although Inhave taken it across the lake) and it handles everything up to 3 feet without much of a problem. Many summer days are 1-2 foot chop and we are always fine in that. You check the forecast and listen to the weather, but there aren't all that many days that we cant take it out.

    If the 10 people are all adults, that can be tight, and not recommended in marginal conditions. If it is two families with a total of 4 adults and 6 kids, pretty comfortable. We did that all the time when our kids were younger.

    When we had our 19' it could still handle a variety of conditions, but not the range that our 24' could. 1-2 feet was fine, anything bigger and we were off the lake.
     
  11. ohioboater

    ohioboater New Member

    16
    Aug 20, 2019
    boatless
    boatless
    Yeah, we will almost always have at least several kids on board if maxing out at 10... can't see adults wanting to ride in the bow for the most part
     
  12. ColoSR

    ColoSR Member

    49
    Apr 25, 2018
    2003 Sea Ray Sundeck 220
    MX 6.2L MPI Mercruiser with 2.2 Bravo III drive
    I don't know how big the waves are on Erie, but for us the bow is actually a pretty popular place for 4 adults to sit and enjoy a few beverages while underway. The V hull really cuts down on the waves compared to some of the more modern wakeboard boats.

    My teen daughter and her friends really like to use the bow filler cushion to make one big padded area up there. Not sure if it is for comfort or that the pad keeps the adults out of the front of the boat. Might be worth a look to see if you can find one if you have kids.

    When buying the boat I had hoped to find one with two tables, but am perfectly happy with one after using the boat for two seasons. It rarely comes out while underway. We use it for lunch in the cabin area when anchored, but that's it. Might be different with a 240 due to the extra real estate.
     
  13. ohioboater

    ohioboater New Member

    16
    Aug 20, 2019
    boatless
    boatless
    Thank you all for the responses...we fell in love with the 240 Sundeck. Thoughts on getting a survey? Getting one lined up in my area (Central Ohio) has been a PITA since most have to travel from the Lake or the River...getting seller, myself and surveyor schedules lined up is the worst part. Survey going to cost about $600 including travel costs (that includes the sea trial as well).
     
  14. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    That price seems reasonable - assuming it's a reputable surveyor. Come to an agreement on the boat/price before doing a survey, with the sale contingent on survey/sea trial.
     

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