Cruising speed with weather enclosure?

Discussion in 'Sport Boats' started by mperlst216, Dec 9, 2016.

  1. mperlst216

    mperlst216 Member

    84
    Jun 4, 2012
    Frisco, Tx
    2001 Sea Ray 210 Sundeck
    Formerly 1998 SR 185, Four Winns 170, Chaparall 233 Sunnesta, SR197,
    5.0 EFI Mercruiser
    I am installing a weather enclosure(eisenglass front, sides and aft) on my 21 Sundeck. What can I cruise at without tearing up the enclosure, or do I need to stay at idle speed?
     
  2. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Active Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    If it's done properly, you can still go as fast as you want for as long as you want. Go have fun!
     
  3. badtothebones

    badtothebones Member

    80
    Oct 22, 2015
    Florida
    2015 260 Sundancer
    ECT 350 MAG MPI BR3
    What do you mean "if done properly"?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  4. Ididntdoit

    Ididntdoit Active Member

    Dec 5, 2007
    East Coast Florida
    300 Sundancer
    5.0MPI Bravo III
    keep a battery powered Carbon Monoxide detector at the helm too - you'd be surprised at how fast (and how much) builds up
     
  5. Sous

    Sous Member

    666
    Jul 27, 2011
    Herring Bay, MD
    2009 330 DA, Raymarine C80, Intellian, VesselView, Kohler, Sea Lift, Central Vac
    MerCruiser 8.1 Horizons DTS
    Installed properly... right hardware, mounted correctly, etc.
     
  6. Sous

    Sous Member

    666
    Jul 27, 2011
    Herring Bay, MD
    2009 330 DA, Raymarine C80, Intellian, VesselView, Kohler, Sea Lift, Central Vac
    MerCruiser 8.1 Horizons DTS
    Actually good point as to the speed question. You'll get more of a build up moving at idle than on plane.
     
  7. trflgrl

    trflgrl Member SILVER Sponsor

    834
    Jun 23, 2014
    Middle Tennessee
    1989 Sundancer 300
    Twin 350 Merc/Alpha 1 Gen 1; Quicksilver 4.0 gen
    Proper installation + a little due diligence: if you hear or see any pieces or parts slapping/flapping/rubbing in a way that could damage the enclosure or your finish, figure out if anything is loose, or check for places where it may be a good idea to wrap a bimini pole/joint to reduce friction....or throttle back 'til it stops and make that your top end.

    And +1 on using a portable carbon monoxide detector in the cockpit. If it reacts, play around with venting to figure out what gives you good circulation but still offers the wind/temp protection you want.
     
  8. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Active Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    Correct on the "done properly" explanations. Thanks for the help in clarification! If it was made and installed by some fly-by-night operation... all bets are off.

    Good warnings on the "station wagon effect", too. When moving, keep the rear panel in place and/or vent the front slightly to keep air moving. You might be surprised at how much comes in at planing speed, too. I was the first time it happened to me!
     

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