Another IO vs Outboard thread...but this is different

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by El Capitan, Jul 10, 2020.

  1. El Capitan

    El Capitan Well-Known Member

    Jul 9, 2014
    Chicago IL./Vero Beach, Fl
    1970 SRV 180 w 2.5L Mercruiser.
    2000 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
    120HP Mercruiser
    So this isn't about the debate which one is better, this is merely an ask for your perspectives on this subject.

    I'm moving early August back to Florida, and I happen to be partial to Sea Rays, and I don't really fish. We putz around, sandbars, snorkle, light water sports w the grand kids, restaurants, no sleeping in the cabin...too hot down there and I don't want to wet slip a 30fter.

    I'd like to find a suitable Sea Ray but wondering about the salt water issues not only circulating through the block and risers but in the air corroding the engine externals.

    Outboards are the trend now...if I buy new it won't be a SR, I like the Hurricane and I like the Yamaha, but Im also open to a nice used 21-23 cuddy or bow rider, these tend to be IO's.

    Your pros and cons please. This is only a sanity check.

    Thank you
     
  2. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    A lot of this, obviously, comes down to personal preference. OB's definitely have the nod to longevity in salt water. There are thousands and thousands of IO's running around in salt water, though - but they do require more maintenance. You just have to weigh the aesthetics and benefits (in your eyes) of everything and see what makes more sense for you. For example, some don't like the looks of the OB back there and/or prefer the full swim platform that an IO offers and are fine with the increased maintenance. Again, personal preference as to what's more important.

    It's been a couple years since I ran a Hurricane, but I do recall that while nothing was really "bad", it was just sort of "OK". And, it rode pretty hard as the hull design wasn't a true deep-V in the bow and the deadrise at the transom was on the shallower side. But again, it's been a while.

    If you're thinking new, have you looked at the 210 or 230 SPX from Sea Ray?
     
  3. GypsmJim

    GypsmJim Active Member

    295
    Aug 8, 2018
    Western New York
    '19 SPX 190 OB, 150 & 5 Mercs
    '17 Whaler 150 Montauk
    '15 Yamaha FXHO
    '60 Mulray Dinghy
    '52 Lyman 15'
    Mercury 150 4-stroke
    68 Outboards representing 11 manufacturers
    I've had Mercuries, Evinrudes, Johnsons, Yamahas, plus a few off-brand outboards. Grew up on a tiller. Got my own boat and upgraded to a steering wheel and remote control. Moved "up" to an I/O because that was the way to go.

    35 years later we moved up to a Boston Whaler fishing boat with a Mercury outboard. OMG what a difference. A year later we upgraded the family boat to a Searay with a Merc outboard. Four Stroke outboards have come a long way...

    We have maybe 15 marine dealers in the area. One is Yami, one Tohatsu, one Honda. ALL THE rest are Mercury. THAT says it all right there.

    I was a JohnnyRude guy all the way. Mercs were always problematic. BUT, After a few years experience now I won't own another boat unless it has a Merc 4-stroke hanging on the back.\
     
    El Capitan likes this.
  4. Andy S.

    Andy S. New Member

    11
    Jul 19, 2019
    1999 Sea Ray 210BR Signature
    260 hp
    Operates in Lake Erie
    350 mercruiser 260 hp bravo ll drive
    I bought a used 1999 sea ray 210 BR with a 260 hp IO. It’s perfect for what we do... pretty much what you do. It’s easy to maintain and I love the integrated swim platform and the way it performs. Perfect for the family day trip!
     
  5. El Capitan

    El Capitan Well-Known Member

    Jul 9, 2014
    Chicago IL./Vero Beach, Fl
    1970 SRV 180 w 2.5L Mercruiser.
    2000 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
    120HP Mercruiser
    Are you in salt?
     
  6. El Capitan

    El Capitan Well-Known Member

    Jul 9, 2014
    Chicago IL./Vero Beach, Fl
    1970 SRV 180 w 2.5L Mercruiser.
    2000 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
    120HP Mercruiser
    Thank you. Good reasoning. I personally like having an IO because I like the hidden engine and full platform without the engine in the middle. Also you can repower w a long block for a fraction of the cost of a new outboard.

    I like the Sea Rays but they are 40%-50% higher at MSRP.

    I really like the Yamaha concept. No outdrive at all. Great deals.
     
  7. GypsmJim

    GypsmJim Active Member

    295
    Aug 8, 2018
    Western New York
    '19 SPX 190 OB, 150 & 5 Mercs
    '17 Whaler 150 Montauk
    '15 Yamaha FXHO
    '60 Mulray Dinghy
    '52 Lyman 15'
    Mercury 150 4-stroke
    68 Outboards representing 11 manufacturers
    Our OB has 2 swim platforms, albeit much smaller than having one big one. The cavernous "hole" where the I/O engine would have been is now unbelievable storage space. Its a tradeoff - we all have different needs.

    Maintenance on an I/O can be stressful. If you have a completely removable doghouse, it's not too bad, but if you don't even changing the oil filter can be an issue. In contrast, you service the outboard standing up and they even have a built-in cup to collect the oil from the filter so you don't spill.

    Winterizing used to be a 3 hour chore. With my OB its 20 minutes, in the garage and you can even do it in bad weather.

    For a comparable performance the OB is lighter, goes faster and uses less fuel. Besides, it just looks cool.
     
  8. Chip S

    Chip S Active Member

    174
    Jun 17, 2019
    Bordentown, NJ
    1993 Sea Ray 200 Overnighter
    1993 Mercury 150 hp Black Max Outboard
    My first boat was a 15 foot bowrider with a Johnson 2 stroke outboard. We outgrew that after a couple of years. I always preferred outboards and wanted to move up to a cuddy cabin with an outboard, but all of the larger cuddy cabins had sterndrives. We ended up buying a 24 foot cuddy cabin with a stern drive. It ran well, but every year I had to sand, prime, and paint the sterndrive. I also had to take it to the dealer every year for service. After 14 years of that I had had enough. We moved to a 26 foot cabin cruiser with a single inboard. The maintenance was minimal but the handling of a single inboard is limited. That boat was totaled in a storm (at the dock, no one onboard) so we had to find a "new" boat. We ended up with an outboard for the following reasons:

    Single inboard: Limited maneuverability
    Twin inboard: Good maneuverability but expensive to run and maintain
    Single sterndrive: Too much maintenance
    Single outboard: Good maneuverability and inexpensive to run and maintain

    My wife and I agree that any boat we have from now on will be a single outboard. 4 stroke outboards are preferred, but my current 2 stroke is acceptable. We won't not buy a boat because the outboard is a 2 stroke.
     
  9. Andy S.

    Andy S. New Member

    11
    Jul 19, 2019
    1999 Sea Ray 210BR Signature
    260 hp
    Operates in Lake Erie
    350 mercruiser 260 hp bravo ll drive
    No. I keep it docked in Lake Erie. Not happy I cannot enjoy it all year round.
     

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