260 Sundancer Windlass Installation (2003 Model)

Discussion in 'Modifications/Customizations' started by KevinC, Apr 3, 2014.

  1. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    When I purchased my boat this was on my wish list but I figured I could always add one.
    This thread is here to document my installation so that others may find similar inspiration.

    Project Inventory:

    • LEWMAR V700G VERTICAL WINDLASS (WINDLASS, ROCKER, BREAKER AND CONTACTOR/SOLENOID)
    • 6 AWG TINNED MARINE BATTERY CABLE (APPROX 50FT RED & 50FT BLACK)
    • 16 AWG TINNED MARINE PRIMARY WIRE (APPROX 25FT EACH GREEN, BLUE & PURPLE)
    • BUSSMAN 187 SERIES 35A (I WANTED A FLUSH MOUNT)
    • 6 AWG TINNED SEAMLESS MARINE LUGS 1/4 POST (APPROX 25)
    • SOME DUAL-WALL ADHESIVE HEAT SHRINK 1/2" RED (3:1 RATIO)
    • VARIOUS SIZES OF OTHER MARINE GRADE SHRINK TUBING
    • VARIOUS OTHER TYPICAL MARINE

    Just some notes regarding my work:
    • For all my connections were crimped and sealed with marine grade shrink tubing to seal them.
    • All the 6AWG terminals were tinned seamless connector with for a 1/4" post.
    • The 6AWG cable is thick so I would up purchasing a hydraulic crimper from harbor freight that made great crimps.
    • I think there were two that I had to drill to slightly enlarge.
    • My terminal connections to posts were booted.
    • I used slightly less than 1 million zip ties.
    • Very little of this work required more than one person.

    Now this project took a lot of planning and based on last year costs I was able to shop around and complete this for less than $950. The only compromise I think I made was that I did not install a battery solenoid that would have come from the factory. This was mitigated buy using the switched thermal breaker.

    Timing wise I would budget a week of part time work daily unless you can work this start to finish.
    That will also give you time to work things out that your may encounter. I always find it better to not rush and actually enjoy the project.

    I am going to post a bunch of photos along with descriptions.
    I pre-wired this install for foot switches at the bow that will not be shown yet as I will be completing them this spring. Take my word, even if you don't think you will need them, you will want to wire for them as you will not want to disassemble the cabin again to run couple of small wires.

    I hope you find this interesting. I loved he project and have received many complements. This project diary is my payback for all the great information I have received. If you want a windlass, have the time, enjoy working with tools and want to save a lot of money this is a great project an my notes should help.

    Of course, this was done on a 2003 260 Sundancer and your model may vary slightly however the process will be similar.
     
  2. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    The first step was planning the project. So I surveyed the installation.

    I first planned where I wanted to install the helm switch. Which I decided to install next to my trim tab switches
    [​IMG]
     
  3. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    Next was to inspect the engine room where the windlass electrical connections would be installed. I plan on connecting to the ground block and run primary connectors to the battery switch. I will also mount a flush mounted thermal breaker here.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2014
  4. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    Up at the bow I will need to relocate the center cleat as it will be in the way of the chain/rope feed. I will also need to position the windlass around the pipe cover which will need to be removed.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    This pocket is the key to chasing wires from the engine compartment as we will see later and we will also need to run the primary up to the battery switch as I want to be able to turn this off in the event of an emergency.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2014
  6. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    Now, we are going to need access to run the cables from the helm to the anchor locker. This will be accomplished by removing the cabin shelves that are in my model. This is also were you will find the factory harness wiring. This is the side closest to the head.

    [​IMG]

    and this is the side closest to the bow. Notice that I have already removed the front speaker. This speaker is held in with super velcro and can be gently pulled out.

    [​IMG]

    and finally the cables will run up in to anchor locker as show from inside looking up.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Nehalennia

    Nehalennia Well-Known Member

    Aug 22, 2007
    Marysville, WA
    2001 310DA twin 350 MAGs, Westerbeke 4.5KW
    Twin 350 MAG V-drives
    I'll be watching this. It's on the "to do" list.
     
  8. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    To remove the shelves you will need to remove the screws from the font of the shelf

    [​IMG]

    and from the back

    [​IMG]

    here is a close up of the screws.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    Thanks Todd! Let me know if you have any questions. I can't believe it's spring already. I never got to this posting over last summer and wanted to do it all winter. But hockey just consumed all our time and here we are again and I am planning my new projects for this year already. I also picked up a 13' Boston Whaler project boat for the kids to learn on last year. Gonna be a busy spring.
     
  10. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    To run the cables from the helm we will need access behind the head. That can be accomplished by taking the closet apart.

    [​IMG]

    and in my case I also needed to remove the door, side cushion, the CO detector and the AC control panel. This was necessary because I could not find an angle to completely pull the shelf away.

    [​IMG]

    While you are doing this CHECK YOUR CO DETECTOR. If it is more that 5-years old it is probably worthless. Go out and get a new one now since you are accessing the wiring. If you have the old style ones the new one from Fireboy is a little smaller. Just a note here on changing the CO detector. CHECK THE DATES !! If you find one online for half-price that is 3 years old you will need to do this again in 2-years and you go less than half the value.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2014
  11. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    I decided it was easiest to start the cabling in the cabin and run the cable forward into the anchor locker and then aft to the helm behind the head. I tied onto the factory mounts and zip-tie'd away. Notice the small gauge cables for the foot switches being installed.

    [​IMG]

    This is the view to the rear:

    [​IMG]

    and the view to the front:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    This is a close-up of the access way to the anchor locker from the cabin. You will not be able to run through the existing tube so you will need to very carefully open up the silicone to run the cable through. You will need to re-seal that from the front an back once completed before closing up the cabin.

    [​IMG]

    note in the above picture that that white cable is your house 110VAC!! Please use caution if your connected to AC.
     
  13. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    Next we headed back to the cockpit. I found it the easiest to remove the captains chair to give me access to the storage pocket. Once we remove the pocket storage we have access to the main cable harness and can run cables from the cabin (behind the head) and later down to the engine compartment.

    [​IMG]

    This is one of the few spots where I needed two people. I had my son in the cabin closet fishing the cables back to the helm while I reached through this access way to get them.

    This is the view behind the head:

    [​IMG]

    The grey wall on the right is the starboard exterior (from the inside) and the ridge is where the hull is joined to the cap. Also, notice the A/C vent tube for those with the A/C compressor in the aft cabin. It runs behind the shell that forms the head and this is how the A/C feeds cool air to the front of the cabin.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2014
  14. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    These are the cables and the approximate lengths. I have already terminated the 6awg cables here and next we get to work up at the bow.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    Very nice, Kevin. I just installed one, myself, this past year. I also used the V700. I'm a little late to help you on this point, but an easier way to get the wires from the cubby (by your feet in the cockpit) past the helm and into the cabin: From the cabin (w/o dismantling the hanging locker), use a stiff fish tape and push it aft. It will show up in the area behind the cubby. Attach a pull string to it and pull the string back to the cabin. Always pull extra string so there's some left after pulling the wires aft. Leave the string for future use.

    How was the plywood coring in the bow? Mine was completely wet and even starting to rot. The way I initially found out was by doing some routine maintenance and tightening the nuts for the anchor roller, cleat, etc. I felt water starting to drip as I did that. Then I pulled the hawse pipe and other structures to check the wood, which is then visible through the various holes. Turns out, there wasn't a whole lot (in other words VERY little - in some areas none) of sealant used on these items.
     
  16. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    My bow was fine not wet at all. But I did make sure that I sealed it real well before installing the windlass. Those pictures are coming along next. I did use the fiberglass wire poles to fish the wire through. I found it easier to remove the closet interior because the AC vent tube was getting in the way as it filled a lot of the space and made finding the clear path harder. I will also admit that I am overly critical of cable paths and do not like them getting knotted and twisted around other cables.
     
  17. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    Understandable!
     
  18. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    It's nice to see someone else's version of the same project. I used 6g, as well. In doing the calculations, it looked like 8g was right on the fringe of being heavy enough, considering the total run and motor requirements. But in the end... better safe than sorry.
     
  19. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    For the difference in price it's not worth the worry. Then take into consideration if there are issues and the vendor says it is wiring related or worse yet an insurance claim and it's denied because of undersized wiring.
     
  20. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    1988 Proline Center Console - 90hp Mariner/Mercury
    1969 Boston Whaler
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    Now for some time up on the bow preparing for the windlass install. First I needed to remove the hause pipe and the cleat that will be in the way of the chain/rope feed.

    [​IMG]

    Once these (and anything else you may have in the way) have been removed we need to find the placement. This is a little tricky as you will want the chain to feed into the windlass as straight as possible from the roller. We will also try to position the windlass as best as possible to cover the hole left by the hause pipe cutout. In my case I was able to cover 99.5%. If you can't cover it you may need to fabric a plate to surround it.

    Also keep in mind that with this model the chain will feed to the starboard side of the gears and then wrap around before being dropped into the locker.


    [​IMG]

    after positioning the windlass you will need to carefully cut out the hole based on the template. If there would have been no cutout for the hause pipe it would have been easier to cut with a hole-saw. Fortunately this does not need to be too neat as it is hidden after installation.

    [​IMG]

    Once we are all cut a shaped it is time for a dry fit of the hardware

    [​IMG]

    Once we remove the template you will get a good idea of what was involved. At this point I sealed all the edges that were cut.


    [​IMG]

    Next we need to place the windlass in a mark and drill the mount holes. I found this a little tricky to get right as the mounting bolts are real long and the bow is fairly thick and curved. The trick is not in positioning the hole but angling them because of the depth and the curvature.

    [​IMG]

    Here you can see what the final fit and look is. The holes from the cleat were sealed as was the one hole that I could not cover with the windlass. I will also be fabricating a plate to cover the hole from the cleat both for look and to function as a rash guard from the chain and rope.

    There is not much to show of the bolting and I currently do not have pictures of them or the wiring. I will be adding the foot switches this year and will get some picture when I am working on them in the next few weeks.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014

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